Tag Archives: Petersons Pipes

Cleaning up an unsmoked NOS Peterson’s System Clay 12


Blog by Steve Laug

The next few blogs I am writing are about pipes that I worked on with Jeff on a recent visit to Idaho for my Father’s 91st birthday. The next and last of these was a pipe that came from one of the pipe lots Jeff picked up on his travels. It was in a group of old, unsmoked pipes. The pipe is a bent clay Billiard stamped Peterson’s System on the left side of the clay and 12 on the right side of the shank. The nickel ferrule is a classic Peterson ferrule with Peterson’s stamped on the left side. The stem is a military bit with a P-lip. The clay bowl and shank are quite nice with casting marks from the front of the bowl all the way down to the ferrule on the underside. It is a seam where the two halves were joined together. The seam looks almost like a crack but it is not. The there is some wear and tear on the pipe from sitting around as NOS (New Old Stock in some pipe shop). There are typical imperfections in the clay bowl. The rim top is a bit rough and there were some casting marks on the inner edge of the bowl. The bowl itself was unsmoked and the inside was very clean. The finish was dirty and somewhat lifeless. The P-lip stem was flawless with no tooth damage or marks. I took the following photos to show what pipe looked like before I started. I took some close up photos of the bowl top and the stem. You can see the roughness in the surface and edges of the rim top – pretty typical of a cast clay pipe. You can also see the dust in the bowl – even a small cobweb in the bottom of the bowl. The P-lip stem is flawless with no oxidation or chatter and tooth marks.I took some photos of the stamping on the pipe. The first photo shows the left side of the shank with forked P of Peterson arched over System. You can also see the Peterson stamp on the nickel ferrule. The second photo shows the 12 shape number on the right side of the shank. Each evening before going to bed, I have been reading the new Peterson book and came across a section on the clay system pipes. If I had not been reading it I would not have been even aware of them. I had left the book at home in Canada as it is large and heavy. So I wrote to Mark Irwin about dating this pipe and getting some information. Mark graciously sent me the information that I needed. Mark wrote as follows:

… What you have is one of the final generations of the Peterson clay System, made in the 1950s-early 60s. The ferrule no longer says “Brevet,” indicating its manufacture has shifted from France to the UK. I forget the name of manufacturer, but I’ll dig around for it. This was still a fair smoking clay, just not the epitome of Peterson’s work with the French. The final iteration would follow in the 70s–which was more of a pipe to blow bubbles with than to actually smoke! A shame really, as the ones from 1896-1940 were absolutely phenomenal.

When I came home on the weekend I look up some information from the late Jim Lily who was a Peterson Collector par-excellence. Jim maintained a Peterson Collector Blog for years and it is still online. Here is the link to the specific page on the Peterson Clay pipes – http://thepetersoncollector.blogspot.com/2012/04/peterson-clay-pipes.html. It confirms what Mark Irwin included above.

I am often asked about Clay pipes made by Peterson and why they are so rare and few.

Peterson made clay pipes during the Patent Era with two shapes being depicted as can be seen in their 1905 Patent Pipe catalogue. It shows shape numbers 8A and 12A. During this period their clay pipes were stamped “Peterson Patent” and could be purchased with either a silver or nickel band. During the Second World War, Peterson again started making clay pipes, due to the shortage of briar. The clays of this period are stamped “Peterson System” and were only offered with nickel bands. They continued making their clays until their London shop finally closed in the 1960s. Examples of which can be seen on page 9 of the 1962 &1965 catalogues, priced seven shillings and six pence!!.

 As to why they are few in number, I suspect that the brittle nature of the clay meant that mortalities would be high.

Both Mark and Jim confirmed that the pipe was from the 50s-early 60s. They were made in the London Shop until the shop closed in the 60s. Now I knew a bit more about the pipe.

For a wrap up on the clay pipe I turned to one of my go to sources for information – Pipedia. From there I learned a bit mofe about the pipes. Here is the link to the section on the clays – https://pipedia.org/wiki/A_Peterson_Dating_Guide;_A_Rule_of_Thumb#Peterson_Clay.2C_Bog_Oak_and_Cherry_Wood_Pipes

Peterson Clay, Bog Oak and Cherry Wood Pipes

(Peterson Clay, Bog Oak and Cherry Wood pipes were offered in the Patent Era with or without a formed case, as also offered with their briar and meerschaum pipes.)

Peterson made clay pipes during the Patent Era with only two shapes being offered and depicted in their 1905 catalogue. During this period their clay pipes were stamped/molded “Peterson Patent” and could be purchased with either a silver or nickel band. How long and in what years Peterson made these clays is not known but as stated above two shapes were offered in their 1905 catalogue. Then during World War II, Peterson again made clay pipes due to the understandable shortage of briar. The clays of this period are stamped “Peterson System” and were only offered with nickel bands. This later production of clay pipes ended with the closing of Peterson’s London Shop in the late 1950s or early 1960s…

Now that I had some background and a potential day for this 60-70 year old pipe it was time to work on it. I polished the bowl with micromesh sanding pads. I had ordered several sets of them before I left Canada and had them shipped to Idaho to arrive while I was there. I wet sanded with 1500-12000 grit pads and wiped the bowl down with a damp cloth after each sanding pad. The only issue that I found was that the seam on the underside and up the front was not glazed like the rest of the bowl. I polished it with the micromesh to try to bring a shine to the area. It worked fairly well. At least I feel like I did not make it worse!! I polished the stem with Mark Hoover’s Before & After updated Fine Polish. It did a great job in bring back the shine and rubbing out the fine minute scratches in the vulcanite.I finished the pipe by buffing it with a microfiber cloth to raise a shine in the clay. The clay took on a rich shine with the buffing and almost glowed. The area around the seam had a shine but was slightly different from the rest of the bowl… This is one of the frustrations of refurbishing and one that still catches me off guard. The finished pipe is shown in the photos below. It is a petite pipe measuring 5 1/4 inches in length, 1 3/4 inches in height. The outside diameter of the bowl is 1 1/8 inches and a chamber diameter of 5/8 of an inch. It is a beautiful little Peterson’s System Bent Billiard that is going to be a fun pipe to break in and enjoy. This is the final pipe that I worked on while I was in Idaho. With the strange stripe on the front and underside of the bowl – where the seam shows clearly and even polishing made stand out more – this pipe will stay with me. Thanks for reading the blog.

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Restoring your own Petersons Pipes – Part 1


Mark Irwin sent me two pipes from the late Mike Leverette’s estate. He had been tasked with selling some of Mike’s pipes for his wife Jeanette. I asked him to pick out a pipe or pipes for restoration that covered the gamut of restoration issues for this article. Mark chose well – a reproduction 1910 Straight Bulldog and Deluxe 11S. He emailed me the descriptions of the pipes (Mark’s description of Pipe #1 is included in italics below and the description of Pipe #2 is in italics in Part 2 of this article) before I actually had the pipes in hand.

Pipe #1 –A Reproduction 1910 straight Bulldog (from the Antique Collection) that looks like it has either been left out in the sun or someone has attempted to remove the original stain. In addition, it has been poorly reamed, with what looks like a pocket knife. Stem and ferrule oxidation, no real dental damage to button.

When the pipes arrived I was excited to open the box and see them in person. It is my habit to spend time looking over a pipe very carefully before I start working on them. In this case I wanted to see the issues that Mark noted firsthand and to note others as well. I decided to work on the two pipes separately. I began with the little Reproduction 1910 Straight Bulldog.  I recorded my observations to give a clear idea of the work that needed to be done. They were as follows:

Photo 1 Bottom side of the pipe and stem

Pipe #1. The pipe is stamped on the left side of the shank Peterson’s over Dublin. On the right side it is stamped Made in Ireland. The stamp has classic Pre-Republic era stampings (the forked tail on the P and “Made in Ireland”). The silver ferrule/end cap is stamped K&P over three hallmarks, the last is a cursive capital “J” which dates the pipe as having been made in 1995. These are stamped above Peterson’s of Dublin on the left side and on the right side of the cap it is stamped 1910 which indicates the year this Bulldog shape first appeared in Peterson’s offer. A first pass over the pipe showed that the finish was as Mark had noted – very faded. The stain was virtually gone and the briar was a dull grey brown in colour. The silver was dented and tarnished; so much so that it was hard to read the hallmarks. The double ring around the bowl was packed with grit and grime as well as some older stain that had bunched up in balls in the grooves. Moving to the rim I could see what Mark had noted regarding the poor reaming. It was very roughly reamed and the nicks from the knife blade were many. This left the bowl out of round. The cake was hard and the surface of the rim had a build up on it that was also quite thick. Removing the stem I could see that the upper right edge of the mortise had a large crack/gap in it where a chunk of briar was missing. The mortise was tarry and dark. The chamber/sump region in the mortise was also quite full of tarry build up and grit. The stem itself was good at the insert end. There were no cracks or missing pieces, which I expected after the chip in the shank. The top side and underside of the stem were dented with tooth marks that had been worked on. The surface had deep scratches and pits in it from the previous work. It looked like the stem had been treated with bleach to deal with the oxidation which leaves the surface pitted. The top 90 degree edge of the button had a divot taken out of it. The hole in the top also was out of round with several small divots removed from the surface. On the underside of the button the ridge/shelf that goes across the bottom of the P-lip had a divot missing as well – a tooth dent that was very evident. The portion of the tenon that sat in the shank was dark and black while the rest of the stem was oxidized and had slight brown tints. The five photos below highlight the areas of concern that would need to be addressed in a restoration/refurbishment.

Photo 1 Bottom side of the pipe and stem

Photo 2 Right side view

Photo 3 Top view

Photo 4 Looking into the shank

Photo 5 Top view of the bowl and shank

After completing my observation of the pipe, I decided to begin the work by cleaning up the inside before dealing with the externals. I reamed the bowl with a PipNet reamer – a T handle with four different sized cutting heads (Photo 6). I started with the smallest head and worked up to the size that fit the internals of the bowl (Photos 8 – 10). My objective was to take the cake out completely bringing the bowl back to briar so that I could reshape the inner edge of the rim and clean up the mess left by the knife reaming job.

Photo 6 PipNet Reamer set

Photo 7 Reaming with the second cutting head

Photo 8 Second Cutting head

Photo 9 Reaming with the third cutting head

Photo 10 Third cutting head

The finished bowl, after reaming with the various cutting heads, is shown in Photo 11 below. Once the cake was gone from the inside of the bowl I could clearly see what needed to be done to bring the bowl back into round and repair the damage to the inner rim. It was at this point I decided to top the bowl. Photo 12 below shows the process of setting up a piece of sandpaper on a hard, flat surface and sanding the bowl top by pressing it into the sandpaper and rotating it to slowly remove damaged briar from the top of the bowl. For this particular bowl I used 220 grit sandpaper. I did not want to leave deep scratches in the rim, but I wanted to smooth out the surface and remove the damaged material. Photo 13 shows the finished bowl top. I removed enough of the surface to get rid of the knife cut angles on the inner edge. Photos14 – 16 show how I sanded the inside edge of the rim using a folded piece of medium grit emery paper. The idea was to work on the inner edge and slowly and carefully bring it back to round and remove the remaining damage left by the knife. After the cleanup I used a fine grit sanding sponge to remove the remaining scratch marks left in the surface of the rim (Photo 17).

Photo 11 After reaming

Photo 12 Topping the bowl

Photo 13 Topped bowl

Photo 14 Smoothing the inner edge

Photo 15 Inner edge after smoothing

Photo 16 Close up of the inner edge

Photo 17 Sanding with a fine sanding sponge

With the bowl back in shape and the rim cleaned and sanded it was time to remove the remnants of the finish on the bowl. I wiped the bowl down with acetone on a soft cotton makeup removal pad (Photos 18 – 20). For the acetone I use fingernail polish remover. I have found that it removes the grit and oils that have ground into the bowl as well as the finish. I wiped the bowl down until I was satisfied that I had removed the finish. The best way to tell this is when the pads come back clean and fresh after wiping the bowl down.

Photo 18 Acetone and cotton pads

Photo 19 Acetone and cotton pads

Photo 20 The bowl and cotton pads after being wiped down

In Photo 21 below, the bowl is dry and clean. The finish is gone. At this point I used the drill bit in the handle of the KleenReem tool to clean out the airway in the shank and bowl. I find that this tool quickly removes the buildup in the airway and is the best way to minimize the number of pipe cleaners used to clean out the shank. I carefully twist the bit into the airway making sure not to twist it through the airway and into the other side of the bowl bottom (Photos 22 – 23).

Photo 21 Clean bowl with KleenReem Pipe Cleaner

Photo 22 Drill bit from the handle

Photo 23 Drill bit inserted into the airway

I cleaned out the double rings around the bowl using a dental pick. I wiped the bowl down with Everclear as I ran the dental pick in the grooves on the bowl. The amount of dried stain and grit that comes out of the rings makes me always take this step when I am cleaning a bulldog or Rhodesian shaped bowl (Photos 24 – 25).

Photo 24 Cleaning the rings

Photo 25 Rings cleaned

Now it was time to turn my attention to the internals of the shank – both the airway and the condensation chamber in the Peterson pipes. In the bents this is the area I call the sump. It collects a lot of tar and oils from the smoke that is drawn through it. It takes detailed work to remove all of the grime. In this case I used many pipe cleaners – both bristle and fluffy as well as cotton swabs to clean out the area. I folded the pipe cleaners in half to give me the area needed to clean out the walls of the shank. Photos 26 – 28 show the work and the resultant pile of cleaners. I cleaned out the area until the pipe cleaners came out clean and the pipe smelled clean.

Photo 26 Time to clean the shank

Photo 27 Folded and inserted

Photo 28 Many pipe cleaners later

For the silver ferrule/cap on the shank I used a jeweler’s cloth that I purchased at a local jewelry shop. It is impregnated with a cleaning solution that effectively removes the level of tarnish found on this cap. I wiped down the cap with the cloth repeatedly until the tarnish was gone and the silver gleamed. Photos 29 – 31 show the polished cap and the cleaned bowl.

Photo 29 Polished cap

Photo 30 Polished cap

Photo 31 Polished cap

With the bowl ready to restain, it was time to turn my attention to the stem. As mentioned above there were some dents and divots in the stem and button area. These would take some work. There are several different procedures that I used in addressing the issues in this stem. I always begin by sanding the area around the dents with 220 grit sandpaper to better assess the damaged areas. If the dents are merely dents then heat will lift them and the stem will return to its smooth surface. If however the dents have edges that are cut then no amount of heat will lift the areas and other methods will need to be employed. In this case the dents were indeed just dents and heat would lift those (Photos 32 – 33). The divots out of the top side of the button and the underside ridge were another matter. To reshape the 90 degree angle on the top side of the button I used a square needle file. I cleaned up the edge of the button and the place it met the surface of the stem (Photos 34 – 35). I used the same file on the bottom side of the button ridge/shelf as well. Again the idea was to clean up the edges and sharpen them the angles (Photo 36). These areas needed to be redefined in order to have the sharp and distinct edges that were originally there.

Photo 32 Topside after sanding

Photo 33 Bottom side after sanding

Photo 34 Reshaping the angles on the button topside

Photo 35 Angles reshaped with files

Photo 36 Reshaping the angles on the button bottom side

I used a Bic lighter to heat the stem surface. The key to this is to quickly move the flame across the surface of the dented areas. Do not leave it in one place too long as it will burn the vulcanite. Quickly passing it over the surface repeatedly and checking often I was able to lift the dents from both the topside and underside of the stem (Photos 37 – 39).

Photo 37 Using a Bic Lighter to lift the dents on the underside of the stem

Photo 39 Underside of the stem after heating

Photo 38 Using a Bic Lighter to lift the dents on the top side of the stem

I sanded the newly smoothed surface with a medium grit sanding sponge. When I finish heating a stem, whether I use a Bic lighter or a heat gun, I sand it to ensure that I have finished lifting the dents. It is easy to be fooled when removing it from the heat. If it needs a bit more heat after the sanding it is a simple task and best done before progressing to the next steps of sanding the stems (Photos 40-41).

Photo 40 Top side sanded with a sanding sponge

Photo 41 Underside sanded with a sanding sponge

To repair the missing chunk of briar from the inside of the shank I used some Weldbond wood glue and briar dust. It is water soluble until it dries and then is hard and impermeable. I cleaned the surface area of the shank and then put the glue in place. I moved it around the area, pressed briar dust into the glue and cleaned up the surrounding area with a dental pick (Photo 42). I set it aside to dry while I returned to the stem cleanup.

Photo 42 Shank repair

For several years now I have been using black superglue (cyanoacrylate) to repair divots from the button and stem areas. It is glue that has been used medically in the field by medics to repair tears in the skin so I believe it is safe. It dries very hard and shiny black and does not disintegrate with cleaning once it is cured. Once the stem is buffed and polished the repair is virtually invisible. On this pipe I needed to build up the divots on the edge of the button on the topside and the ridge on the underside. I purchased the black superglue from Stewart Macdonald, a supplier of repair products for musical instruments (http://www.stewmac.com/). It is slow drying so you may want to consider purchasing an accelerator product from them as well. I apply the glue to the areas I am repairing and set it aside overnight (Photos 43 – 45). It dries hard in about 6-8 hours and cures in just over twelve hours. I find that once it is dry to touch I can sand the surface and blend it into the stem.

Photo 43 Black Superglue on the ridge of the button

Photo 44 Black Superglue on the topside divot on the button

Photo 46 Superglue dried on the underside ridge

Photo 47 Glue dried on the topside

The next series of photos show the progressive sanding of the stem with 1500-12,000 grit micromesh sanding pads (Photos 48 – 59). These are also available through Steward Macdonald as well as other fine woodworking stores or can be ordered online.

Photo 48 Sanding the topside with 1500 grit micromesh

Photo 49 Sanding the underside with 1500 grit micromesh

Photo 50 Sanding the topside with 1800 grit micromesh

Photo 51 sanding the underside with 1800 grit micromesh

Photo 52 Sanding the topside with 2400 grit micromesh

Photo 53 Sanding the underside with 2400 grit micromesh

Photo 54 Sanding the topside with 3200 and 3600 grit micromesh

Photo 55 Sanding the underside with 3200 and 3600 grit micromesh

Photo 56 Sanding the topside with 4000 and 6000 grit micromesh

Photo 57 Sanding the underside with 4000 and 6000 grit micromesh

Photo 58 Sanding the topside with 8000 and 12,000 grit micromesh

Photo 59 Sanding the underside with 8000 and 12,000 grit micromesh

By this time the shank repair was dry. Photos 60 and 61 show the dried and finished repair. I used a small piece of folded 220 grit sandpaper to smooth out the repaired area.

Photo 60 Finished shank repair

Photo 61 Finished shank repair

I wanted to match the stain on the pipe to the original stain on this line of pipes so I researched the line on the internet and found the picture below (Photo 62) that gave me a good idea of what the stain colour should be. In studying the photo I could see both brown and red stains were used to bring out this colouration. For me this would be a two step staining process.

Photo 62 Correct stain colour

I started with a dark brown aniline stain. I have used Feibing’s Leather Dye for years as it is an aniline based stain and works very well. I thinned it 2:1 with Isopropyl alcohol to get the brown I wanted in the undercoat (2 parts stain to 1 part alcohol). I remove the stem for the staining and insert a dental pick in the shank for a handle to hold while I turn the bowl in my hands during the staining. I applied it to the bowl with a folded pipe cleaner. Once the bowl was covered with stain and while it is wet I light it on fire with a lighter. This is called flaming. It burns off the alcohol and sets the stain more deeply into the grain of the briar. Generally I start by staining the bottom of the pipe first as the stain runs toward the top naturally and then follow up with the side, back and front of the bowl. I stain the rim last and am careful to not get stain inside the bowl. I repeat the process of staining and flaming the bowl until I am happy with the coverage. Photos 63 – 66 show the bowl after it has been stained, flamed, and stained and flamed again.

Photo 63 Stained bowl topside view

Photo 64 Stained bowl right side

Photo 65 Stained bowl left side

Photo 66 Stained bowl underside

I hand buffed the newly stained pipe with a soft cotton terry cloth (old piece of bath towel) until the finish had a shine. I do this to check the coverage of the undercoat. I want to make sure that the coverage is even and that there are no heavy spots or weak spots before I give the pipe the next coat of stain (Photos 67-68).

Photo 67 Right side after hand buffing

Photo 68 Left side after hand buffing

I applied the second stain to the bowl. For this I used an oxblood coloured aniline paste stain. I don’t worry about getting it on the stem as it is thicker and does not run when applied. I start at the bottom of the bowl out of habit with this stain. I work my way around the bowl, making sure to get an even coverage of stain and finish the process by carefully staining the rim (Photos 69 – 70). Once it is applied I let it dry for about 3 minutes and then wipe it off with a soft cloth and cotton pads. I want the colour to stay in the briar but not be wet on the surface (Photos 71 – 73). Again I check for coverage to make sure I have an even colour over the entire bowl. I reapply stain to weak spots to blend them into the colour. I want an even stain coat on the entire bowl. I hand buffed the bowl a second time to check on the colour and compare it against the photograph that I had found online (Photos 74 – 77).

Photo 69 Oxblood stain applied

Photo 70 Oxblood stain applied

Photo 71 Right side after being wiped down

Photo 72 Leftside after being wiped down

Photo 73 Top side after being wiped down.

Photo 74 Right side after hand buffing

Photo 75 Leftside after hand buffing

Photo 76 Top side after hand buffing

Photo 77 Underside after hand buffing

While I liked the colour of the bowl I found that it was too dark to really match the photo colour. I wet a cotton pad with acetone and wiped the bowl down to reduce the opacity of the stain and lighten it slightly. I only wiped it down once and carefully covered the whole bowl in one detailed wipe down to keep the coverage even. The new colour look lighter and almost appears to be too light but I have learned that after I buff it and give it several coats of wax it will be a match.

Photo 78 Right side after being wiped down with acetone

Photo 79 Leftside after being wiped down with acetone

Photo 80 Underside after being wiped down with acetone

Photo 81 Topside after being wiped down with acetone

I took the bowl to the buffer and gave it a quick buff with White Diamond on the buffing wheel. It gave the bowl a good shine. I brought it back to my work table and applied a coat of Conservator’s Wax which is a microcrystalline wax and cleaner. I have found that this gives the bowl a deeper polish and shine. After that I generally take it to the buffing wheel and give it multiple coats of carnauba wax (Photos 82 – 83).

Photo 82 After buffing and waxing

Photo 83 After buffing and waxing

At this point in the process of refurbishing the work is just about finished. The cleanup and restoration work is done and all that remains is to apply the final coats of carnauba wax to polish and protect the “new” look of your pipe.

The final photos show the finished pipe. It has had several coats of carnauba wax and was buffed with a clean flannel buffing pad on the buffer. The shine is deep and rich. The stem looks new and the rich dark shine reflects light well.The tooth marks are gone and there is no sign of their earlier presence. The bowl is back in round and ready to load up and smoke.

Photo 84 Right side view of the finished pipe.

Photo 85 Left side view of the finished pipe

Photo 86 Bottom side view of the finished pipe

Photo 87 Top view of the finished pipe

Photo 88 Top view of the finished pipe

An Antique Store Find – A Peterson’s “Sports” 5 Bent Billiard


Blog by Steve Laug

I am back at it after a slow start this morning – long week, late nights combined for a sleep in this morning. The first pipe on the table is from a pipe hunt that Jeff did in Montana. It came from an antique shop where we have often found some good pipes. It is a small Peterson’s bent billiard with a normal Peterson’s P-lip stem. This has some stunning birdseye and flame grain around the bowl and shank. The pipe is stamped on the left side of the shank Peterson’s over “SPORTS” and on the right side Made in the Republic of Ireland and the shape number 5. It was another really dirty pipe like most of the ones we are finding. The finish was very dirty with a thick cake in the bowl and a layer of lava overflowing on to the rim top. It was hard to know what the condition of the rim top or what the inner edge of the rim looked like because of the lava and cake. The outer edge of the rim had some nicks and dents in it that are visible in the photos of the rim top. Other than being dirty the finish also appeared to look very good. The stem was lightly oxidized with light tooth chatter and marks. The P stamp on the left side of the stem was faded. The P-lip was in ok condition. Jeff took some photos of the pipe to show the condition it was in before he started working on it. He took photos of the rim top to show the thick cake in the bowl and the overflow of lava. The cake is thick and hard and the lava overflow is heavy on the rim. There is old tobacco debris stuck in the cake. The bowl and the rim are a real mess. I used to think it was carelessness that let a pipe get this way but the longer I work on pipes the more I realize that this must have been someone’s favourite pipe. I wish it could speak and tell us its story.He took a photo of the right side and heel of the bowl to show some of the grain and the condition of the pipe. The patina on the pipe is really quite beautiful and I hope to preserve that in the clean up and restoration.Jeff took photos of the stamping on both sides of the shank to capture the clarity of it even under the grime. It is clear and legible. You can also see the P stamp on the left side of the stem.The vulcanite stem was heavily oxidized (as is often the case with Peterson’s) and there was tooth wear on the top edge of the p-lip button. The stem also had a lot of chatter both sides and some calcification around the p-lip and the first inch of the stem.I remembered reading a blog on the “Sports” line on Mark Irwin’s Blog so I turned there and did a quick search (http://www.petersonpipenotes.org/tag/peterson-sports-pipe). I found it and read through it again. It refers to a new line called the Sportsman, but there is a section on the blog that refers to the line that I have in hand. I quote from that portion of the article below.

K&P has shown an interest in pocket pipes almost since their founding. The 1905 catalog features a number of them, including outdoor pipes like the R.I.C. (which stands for Royal Irish Constabulary, the name of the official Irish police force back in the day), and indoor “opera” pipes like the Oval and the Pat. The oval-bowled pipes were meant to fit neatly inside one’s tail coat for smoking entr’act.

Since then there’s been the SPORTS line, introduced in 1947 but not well known in the States until the early 1970s. These pipes used full-size Classic Lines bowls but cut down the shanks to accommodate small P-Lips (except on the original 5 Bulldog, which just used a stubby full-sized stem. There was a renewed interest in the Sports line in the first decade of this century, emanating from Italy, where they’ve been a constant seller over the years, and some of them have made their way onto the U.S. market.

The pipe I have in hand comes from those early days as is noted by the stamping and the shape of the P on the stem. I now know that it was made post 1947. The Made in the Republic of Ireland stamping on the right side of the shank gave me a clue for more potential help in narrowing the date. I turned to Pipedia’s Peterson’s Dating Guide  to see if I could narrow the date further (https://pipedia.org/wiki/A_Peterson_Dating_Guide;_A_Rule_of_Thumb). Sadly it widened the field rather than narrowing it down. I quote the pertinent part of the article below.

The Republic Era is from 1949 until the present. The Republic of Ireland was formed on 17 April 1949. From 1949 to present the stamp for this era is “Made in the Republic of Ireland” in a block format generally in three lines but two lines have been used with or without Republic being abbreviated.

That is as close as I can get on the date. It thus was made somewhere between 1949 and the 1970s. My brother found it in a Montana antique shop so it had made it to the American Market.

When the pipe arrived here in Vancouver I was amazed at how good it looked. Jeff had already done the usual cleanup of the pipe before sending it to me. He had reamed the bowl with a PipNet pipe reamer and cleaned it up with a Savinelli Fitsall Pipe Knife. He scrubbed the exterior with Murphy’s Oil Soap and a tooth brush to clean off the grime off the finish and the heavy overflow of lava on the rim top. He cleaned up the internals of the shank, mortise and stem with pipe cleaners, cotton swabs and alcohol to remove all of the oils and tars in the pipe. I took photos of it before I started my part of the restoration. I took photos of the rim top and the stem to show their condition. Jeff was able to clean up the thick cake and lava overflow that was shown in the rim and bowl in the earlier photos. He was also able to get rid of the grime and grit in the surface of the briar. The rim top looked a lot better than when he started. The inner edge showed some damage and was a little out of round. There were some nicks on the outer edge but overall it should clean up very well. I decided to address the issue with the inner edge of the rim first. I used a folded piece of 220 grit sandpaper to smooth out the damage. It cleaned up pretty well.Once I finished with the work on the rim edge, I polished the surface with micromesh sanding pads – wet sanding with 1500-2400 grit pads and dry sanding with 3200-12000 grit pads. I wiped the rim down with a damp cloth after each pad. I was able to polish out the scratches without damaging the finish on the bowl or the rim. The finish looked very good once I was done polishing it. I decided to leave the small spots on the bowl sides as they were a testament of the pipe’s journey’s and I did not want to risk damaging the patina. I rubbed the bowl and shank down with Before & After Restoration Balm to deep clean the finish on the bowl and shank. The product works to clean, enliven and protect the briar. After it sat for a little while I wiped it off and buffed it with a soft cloth. The briar really began to have a rich shine. I took some photos of the bowl at this point to mark the progress in the restoration. It is a beautiful bowl. I set the bowl aside and worked on the stem at this point in the  process. I sanded the tooth chatter and marks on the button and the stem with 220 grit sandpaper and 400 grit sandpaper.I polished the stem with 1500 grit micromesh and cleaned up the stamping on the side. I used a white out correction pen to put some white back in the stamped P. I buffed it out with a folded pipe cleaner and then cleaned it up with a 1500 grit micromesh pad.I polished the stem with micromesh sanding pads – wet sanding with 1500-2400 grit pads and dry sanding with 3200-12000 grit pads. I wiped the stem down after each pad with Obsidian Oil to remove the sanding dust. I polished Before & After Pipe Stem Polish – both Fine and Extra Fine. I gave it a final hand buff with some Obsidian Oil and laid it aside to dry. I put the stem back on the pipe and the pipe to the buffer. I worked it over with Blue Diamond to polish out the remaining small scratches in the briar and the vulcanite. I gave the bowl and the stem several coats of carnauba wax and buffed the pipe with a clean buffing pad to raise the shine. I hand buffed it with a microfiber cloth to deepen the shine. I love the way that the buffer brings a shine to the pipe. I was happy with the look of this old Pete “Sports” pocket pipe. The photos below show what the pipe looks like after the restoration. The polished black vulcanite stem looks really good with the contrasting browns of the briar. The dimensions of the pipe are Length: 4 1/2 inches, Height: 1 3/4 inches, Outside diameter of the bowl: 1 1/8 inches, Chamber diameter: 5/8 of an inch. Still considering what I want to do with this old timer. I have not seen one like it before so it may hang around for a bit. This one should be a great smoker. Thanks for walking through the restoration with me on yet one more beauty!

Peterson’s System #314 Limited Edition


Blog by Paresh Deshpande

Having restored my grandfather’s Pete System # 31, Made in Eire, a few months back (for those who would be interested in reading the write up, here is the link: https://rebornpipes.com/2018/06/01/restoring-my-grandfathers-petersons-system-31-made-in-eire-billiard/), and after I had received my Pete System #307, Made in Eire, duly restored and in pristine condition from Mr. Steve Laug, I have been fascinated by Peterson System pipes. So while surfing eBay, I came across this Peterson System #314. What I found most interesting was the “LIMITED EDITION” stamp under the shank and the sterling silver ferrule!!!!

This Pete is a medium sized pipe with beautiful cross grains extending from the front and back of the bowl along the underside and top of the shank right up to the Sterling Silver ferrule at the shank end. Densely packed, beautiful birdseye adorn the sides of the pipe. The sterling silver ferrule is stamped “Peterson’s” in cursive hand over “DUBLIN” followed by “STERLING” over “SILVER” in block letters. This is followed by three hallmarks. The bowl is stamped on the left side as “PETERSON’S” with a forked “P” over “SYSTEM” in an arch while the right side is stamped with COM stamp of “MADE IN THE” over “REPUBLIC” over “OF IRELAND” in three lines followed by shape number “314”. The bottom of the shank is stamped “LIMITED” over “EDITION”. Yes, there are a large number of stampings on this pipe and all are clear and crisp. However, the stamping on the stem is conspicuous by its absence. It is felt that the more detailed the stampings on a pipe; the easier it is to accurately date it. But believe you me, Gentlemen and Ladies; this set of stampings set me on a wild goose chase!!! The reason for this was that the era of forked “P” in Peterson’s did not correspond with the COM stamp. Also the letter “K” in the silver hallmark date did not match with either the forked P or the COM stamp. Thus, I was unsure about dating this pipe when I spoke to my mentor, Mr. Steve of rebornpipes and he clarified the issue. I was informed that Petersons came out with limited edition pipes to commemorate a particular pipe and this particular specimen was to commemorate the System pipe. He further advised that the Hallmarks would help me date this piece.

With this input, I channeled my energies in that direction. The first thing I did was to check the Hallmarks that were seen on the silver ferrule. The same were as seen in the picture below and I have highlighted the letter “K” which will help in dating.Thereafter, I searched for hallmark charts and the Dublin Assay Office in particular and chanced upon a chart which I found most relevant and have highlighted the letter “K”. Thus, I can safely say that the pipe dates from 1997. It is also pertinent to mention that the now famous “P-LIP” invention by Peterson was in 1898!!!! Thus, could it be possible that this pipe was made by Petersons to commemorate 100 years of this revolutionary invention????? I don’t know!!!!Now that the issue of dating was settled, the forked “P” was still haunting me and led me to search for further inputs on this issue. I came across the under mentioned site and have extracted relevant portion from this site: http://thepetersoncollector.blogspot.com/2010/07/welcome-to-my-new-blog.html

The “Made in Ireland” block format (above) can be another headache in dating Peterson pipes since this stamp was used in the late Patent Era as well as the late 1940s. So for a guide we must take into consideration the style of lettering Peterson used on their pipes. From the start of the Patent Era until somewhere in the early 1930s, Peterson used the “Old Style” lettering that used a forked tail “P” in Peterson.

From then until now, Peterson used the more familiar script “P” (above) intermixed with a plain block letter “P.” Later in the 1970s, Peterson began production of “commemorative” pipes, often referred to as “replica” or “retro” pipes and these will also have the old style lettering but according to the pipes that we own and have seen, most of these will have a small difference in the original forked tail “P”. Again, there appears to be a cross-over with the old style forked tail and the later forked tail P’s (below). However, these commemorative pipes generally have a silver band with hallmarks so one can date these pipes by the hallmark.

Thus, my curiosity regarding the issue of COM stamp, forked P and hallmarks seen on this pipe were all tied up together and I proceeded to the next stage of my restoration process.

INITIAL VISUAL INSPECTION

The bowl is not very dirty but the beautiful grains are all dull and lackluster. However, all the stampings are very distinct, clear and crisp. The bowl has a decent build up of cake inside while the reservoir is completely clogged and filled with tar and gunk. The smell from the bowl was very strong, though sweet and will have to be addressed. Draught hole is clogged and air does not pass freely through it. The rim of the bowl has some overflowed tars, oils and grime but it’s not heavy. This should be easily addressed. However, the inner edge of the bowl has taken some serious beating and needs to be addressed.The stem is heavily oxidized with light bite marks near the lip on both surfaces. Air does not flow easily through the airway and will have to be cleaned. THE PROCESS

Abha started her work of cleaning the chamber by reaming it with a Kleen Reem pipe cleaner and followed it up with my own fabricated pipe knife, scrapping all the cake from the bottom and walls of the chamber. Once she reached the bare briar, she further scrapped the cake from the walls by sanding the chamber with a 220 grit sand paper. This also helps to even out the wall surfaces.Once the bowl was reamed down to its bare briar, it was evidenced that the inner edge of the rim was damaged and also there was a burn mark on the left side of the bowl in the 7 o’clock direction.The best way to tackle this issue was to lightly top the rim on a 220 grit sand paper and create a slight bevel on the inner edge of the rim. I was very deliberate and cautious while working the burn mark and scrapped the burnt briar to expose the solid wood. Once the topping was done and bevel created, I polished the rim top with the micromesh pads, wet sanding with 1500 to 2400 pads and dry sanding it with 3200 to 12000 grit pads. I was very satisfied with the result of this process. I turned my attention to cleaning the internals of the bowl. With regular and hard bristled pipe cleaners dipped in alcohol, I attempted to clean the draught hole and the reservoir. I soon realized that there is a lot more gunk and tars accumulated in the reservoir and hence used a spatula to dig out the oils and tars from it. I gave a thorough wipe down to the insides of the bowl and shank with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl alcohol.The smell in the bowl was addressed by a salt and alcohol bath. I filled the bowl and shank with kosher salt keeping it slightly below the rim level. I filled it with isopropyl alcohol and left it overnight to do its magic. I usually seal the shank end with a plastic sheet tightly wrapped around a cue tip to avoid the alcohol from oozing out, but in this case since the shank is upturned, there was no need to do so. By next morning the salt is dark colored, more so the shank. I removed all the salt and with a pipe cleaner cleaned the bowl and shank of any residual salts. I blew through the draught hole to dislodge the trapped salts. I wiped the bowl clean and dried the shank and bowl with paper napkins and set it aside to dry for an entire day. By evening, the pipe was nice and dry and all the smells were history.While the bowl was drying, I worked on the stem. I started by flaming the surface of the stem with a Bic lighter. This helps to raise the minor tooth chatter and deeper bite marks to the surface to a great extent. I followed it up with sanding it down with a 220 grit sand paper. I took special care and efforts to enhance the lip and lip edges on both surfaces. To finish the stem restoration, I it with micromesh pads, wet sanding with 1500 to 2400 pads and dry sanding it with 3200 to 12000 grit pads. I wiped it down with Extra Virgin Olive oil in between the pads. The stem is now nice, shining and glossy black.I cleaned the bowl with undiluted Murphy’s oil soap and toothbrush and thereafter rinsed it under warm running water. I took care that water does not enter into the chamber and the mortise. Thereafter I dried the stummel with a paper napkin and a soft cotton cloth. Once the bowl had dried, I rubbed some “Before and After Restoration” balm in to the surface. The transformation is almost immediate. The bowl now has a nice lively sheen to it. I left it to rest for a few moments and then polished it with a soft cotton cloth. To finish, I rubbed a small quantity of PARAGON WAX in to the stummel and polished it by hand using a soft cotton cloth and reattached the stem. This wax was also rubbed on to the stem and polished again. The finished pipe is shown below. I sincerely hope that you have enjoyed reading this write up as much as I enjoyed working on it and writing and researching this pipe.

Cleaning up a Peterson of Dublin Killarney Ebony 999 Rhodesian


Blog by Steve Laug

The next pipe on the work table was a Peterson of Dublin 999 – one of my favourite shapes. This one is a dress edition (coated with a shiny black paint). In researching the pipe a bit I found that it was part of what was called the Killarney Ebony Series. Where the typical Killarney sported a rich red stain, this one had a shiny black finish. There were a few very small dings but none breaking through the finish. The top of the bowl was a little dirty but nothing significant. The end of the shank had a silver band with a black acrylic insert. The pipe was a classic 999 Peterson’s Rhodesian with a thicker shank. The left side of the shank was stamped Peterson over of Dublin in an arc over Killarney. The right side was stamped with the shape number 999. The outside of the pipe was clean. There was a thin cake in the bowl, a slight buildup of grime on the top of the rim. The tapered fishtail stem was oxidized but the Peterson P logo on the left side was perfect. There were not any tooth marks and only light tooth chatter on the stem. I took photos of the pipe before I cleaned it up. I took a close up photo of the bowl and rim to show the condition of the pipe before I started to work on it. The top was dirty with some tarry residue but no damage to the surface of the rim. The bowl had a thin cake but looked to be solid. There was a very sweet smelling aromatic tobacco scent to the entire pipe. The finish of the bowl was in good condition. The second and third photos show the condition of the stem.I cleaned off the buildup on the top of the rim with a cotton pad and saliva until the rim top was clean. It would need to be polished but it was clean and undamaged. I reamed the bowl with a Savinelli Fitsall Pipe Knife and scraped the cake back to bare briar.Because of the overwhelming sweet aromatic smell I stuffed cotton balls into the bowl and filled it with 99% isopropyl alcohol to leach out the oils in the briar. I put a folded pipe cleaner in the shank to wick out the oils in the shank. I use an ear syringe (bulb) to put the alcohol in the bowl and keep it off of the finish. I did not want to damage the painted shiny black finish with the alcohol. The P logo on the stem was in perfect condition so I worked around that so as not to damage it. I lightly sanded the stem down with 220 grit sandpaper to remove the oxidation and tooth chatter on both sides of the stem at the button. I polished the stem with micromesh sanding pads – wet sanding with 1500-2400 grit pads and dry sanding with 3200-12000 grit pads. I wiped the stem down after each pad with Obsidian Oil to preserve and protect the rubber. I finished polishing the stem with Before & After Pipe Stem Polish – both Fine and Extra Fine polish. I polished it and afterward I gave it a final coat and set it aside to dry. After the bowl had been sitting with the alcohol and cotton balls overnight I took the following photo to show how much of the tars and oils leached out into the cotton. I removed them and threw them away. I scrubbed out the bowl with a cotton pad to remove the remaining debris from the cotton. I scrubbed out the shank – working on the mortise with pipe cleaners, cotton swabs and alcohol until it was clean. I cleaned the airway in the shank and stem with alcohol and pipe cleaners as well. I always use 99% isopropyl alcohol because of the low percentage of water in it and the quick evaporation rate.With the interior and exterior of the pipe clean I rubbed down the briar with Before & After Restoration Balm. I worked it into the plateau on the rim top and shank end as well as into the smooth briar on the rest of the bowl and shank. The Balm works to clean, enliven and protect the briar. I worked it into the briar with my fingertips and the help of a horsehair shoe brush. I let the balm sit for a little wall and then buffed with a cotton cloth to raise the shine. The briar came alive with the balm. I took the following photos to give a picture of the pipe at this point in the process. I the polished the bowl and stem on the buffing wheel with Blue Diamond to remove the remaining small scratches and raise the shine. I gave the bowl and stem multiple coats of carnauba wax and buffed the pipe with a clean buffing pad to raise the shine. I hand buffed it with a microfiber cloth to deepen the shine. The pipe polished up pretty nicely. This turned out to be a beautiful pipe in terms of shape and finish. The finished pipe is shown in the photos below. The dimensions are Length: 6 inches, Height: 1 1/2 inches, Outside diameter of the bowl: 1 3/4 inches, Chamber diameter: 3/4 of an inch. Thanks for walking through the restoration with me as I worked over the Peterson’s Killarney Ebony. I will be adding it to the rebornpipes store shortly so if you are interested in adding it to your collection send me an email or a message on Facebook. Thanks for looking. 

Refreshing a NOS 2012 Peterson’s Pipe of the Year Diplomat


Blog by Steve Laug

Not too long ago I went for coffee with a friend of mine who used to own a pipe shop. He had some pipes to sell and wanted me to have a look. He wanted me to offer them for sale on rebornpipes. This is the third pipe of the lot that he sent home with me. It was a New Old Stock (NOS) unsmoked, Peterson’s Pipe of the Year for 2012. The 2012 Peterson Pipe of the Year continues the tradition of using the then new “B Line” shapes. It is a bit of hybrid shape that combines a stout bodied Brandy shape with a Diplomat shape. It has a flattened bottom on the bowl that enables the pipe to sit. It features a squat bowl with oval shank. This smooth finished pipe has the traditional Peterson reddish brown staining and the use of higher graded briar shows through. The vulcanite, saddle stem is matched with a (0.925 sterling) silver band embossed with the Peterson “P” on the top side and embossed hallmarks identifying the year of the pipe on the underside of the band. The smooth finish version is numbered and comes packaged in the 2012 grey box. The vulcanite stem was a fishtail style stem rather than a P-lip. The pipe is highly collectible. The photos below show the packaging and what I saw when I opened the box and removed it from the green Peterson’s of Dublin pipe sock. I took it out of the box and took photos to show the condition. You can see that the finish is flawless with some nice grain around the bowl. The silver band is tarnished but undamaged. It has a large cursive Peterson’s P on the top of the oval band and hallmark stamps on the underside that matches the 2012 year. The bowl inside was polished and smooth. It was indeed unused. The stem was flawless and there was no oxidation or discolouration to be detected. There were no marks on the stem also showing that it was unused. The airway in the shank and the stem were clean and polished. It is stamped on the topside of the shank Peterson’s with the old forked P arched over Dublin. On the underside it is stamped LIMITED EDITION over 534/1000 indicating that this is the 534 pipe out of a total of 1000 pipes that had been made for the POY 2012. The pipe is a beauty and the silver will really stand out once it is polished and cleaned.

The measurements of the pipe are as follows – Length: 5.47 in./138.94 mm, Weight: 1.90 oz./53.86 g, Bowl Height: 1.56 in./39.62 mm, Chamber Depth: 1.25 in./31.75 mm,   Chamber Diameter: 0.78 in./19.81 mm, Outside Diameter: 1.79 in./45.47 mm. I took some close up photos of the rim, bowl and underside of the bowl to show the condition of the pipe. You can see the tarnish on the band but you can also see the P on the topside and the hallmarks on the underside. I would be better able to read the hallmarks once I had removed the tarnish on the silver. The fishtail stem was in perfect condition and had a rich shine to vulcanite. I polished the silver band using a jeweler’s cloth and rubbed the band until the silver shone and the tarnish was gone.I took some close up photos of the shank and band to show the stamping on both. I did some hunting for information on the 2012 POY and could not find any hallmark charts that went beyond 2010. I am working with the assumption that the markings on the silver band match the stamping on the pipe and the mark on the box. The pipe has the standard Peterson’s Hallmarks. The first mark is the Hibernia which identifies the country of origin as Ireland. The second mark is .925 which is the fineness mark denoting the quality of the silver used. The third mark is the date mark which in this case is the cursive A which I am assuming identifies the year of manufacture as 2012 to match the date on the box and the POY 2012 designation.This beautiful pipe is a worthy addition to a Peterson’s Collector’s rack. It has stunning grain and polished silver. The combination looks really good with the black of the stem. The pipe is new old stock (NOS) and has never been smoked or even handled much since 2012. The measurements of the pipe are as follows – Length: 5.47 in./138.94 mm, Weight: 1.90 oz./53.86 g, Bowl Height: 1.56 in./39.62 mm, Chamber Depth: 1.25 in./31.75 mm, Chamber Diameter: 0.78 in./19.81 mm, Outside Diameter: 1.79 in./45.47 mm. I am adding it to the rebornpipes store shortly. If you would like to add it to your collection let me know via email to slaug@uniserve.com or send me a message on Facebook. Thanks for looking.

Refreshing a Pair of NOS Peterson’s Silver Caps from 2000


Blog by Steve Laug

Not too long ago I went for coffee with a friend of mine who used to own a pipe shop. He had some pipes to sell and wanted me to have a look. The first of the pipes was a pair of Peterson’s Silver Caps from 2000. These were brand new pipes – unsmoked and really never put out in his store. They were still in their original boxes. One of the boxes had the $600 price tag still intact on the end. The pipes included a 106 Billiard and a 150 Bulldog. Each pipe was boxed and included the original Peterson’s of Dublin Established 1865 Pipe Sock in the box. These pipes are both clean and unsmoked. The only issue with them was that the silver rim cap, band and P on the stem were tarnished and blackened from sitting. The Bulldog had a P-lip style stem while the Billiard had a fishtail stem with a removable adapter in place in the tenon so that it could be smoked with the Peterson’s 9mm filters that were included in the box.I took each pipe out of the box and took pictures of it to show its general condition. The Bulldog was first. You can see the finish is flawless with some nice grain around the bowl. The silver cap and band are tarnished but undamaged. Both have hallmark stamps on them so I should be able to identify the year of manufacture of the pipe. The silver P on the left side of the saddle stem is also tarnished but undamaged. When I opened the cap the bowl inside was polished and smooth. It was indeed unused. The stem was flawless and there was no oxidation or discolouration to be detected. There were no marks on the stem also showing that it was unused. The airway in the shank and the stem were clean and polished. It is stamped on the left side of the shank Peterson’s with the old forked P arched over Dublin. On the right side it has the shape number 150 and reads Made in the Republic of Ireland. The pipe is a beauty and the silver will really stand out once it is polished and cleaned. I took some close up photos of the rim cap and the stem to show the condition. You can see the tarnish on the rim cap and the deep shine on the stem. The cap also bore hallmarks that I would be better able to read when I had cleaned up the silver. The band also bore hallmarks that would be readable as well.The Billiard was second. You can see the finish is flawless with some nice grain around the bowl. The silver cap and band are tarnished but undamaged. Both have hallmark stamps on them so I should be able to identify the year of manufacture of the pipe. The silver P on the left side of the tapered fishtail stem is also tarnished but undamaged. When I opened the cap the bowl inside was polished and smooth. It was unused as well. The stem was flawless and there was no oxidation or discolouration to be detected. There were no marks on the stem also showing that it was unused. The airway in the shank and the stem were clean and polished. It is stamped on the left side of the shank Peterson’s with the old forked P arched over Dublin. On the right side it has the shape number 106 and reads Made in the Republic of Ireland. This pipe is a beauty as well and the silver will really stand out once it is polished and cleaned.  I took some close up photos of the rim cap and the stem on the billiard to show the condition. You can see the tarnish on the rim cap and the deep shine on the stem. The cap also bore hallmarks that I would be better able to read when I had cleaned up the silver. The band also bore hallmarks that would be readable as well.The Billiard came with an adapter in the tenon that was removable allowing the pipe to be smoked with or without the 9MM Absorba Filters. The pictures below show the adaptor in and out of the tenon. I polished the silver on both pipes with a jeweler’s polishing cloth that removes tarnish and protects silver. I worked over the bands and caps on both pipes as well as the silver P on the stems.I did some hunting for information on the pipes in a Peterson’s Catalogue I have on rebornpipes (https://rebornpipes.com/2015/05/15/a-beautiful-peterson-of-dublin-pipe-catalogue/). I have copied several pages from the catalogue for use here. The first page shows the Silver Cap series. The two pipes in this blog are Natural Finished pipes – shape number 150 and number 106. I have circled both of them in the picture below.The second page I have included is a hallmark chart below that helps date the pipes. Both pipes have the standard Peterson’s Hallmarks. On both pipes each hallmark is the same. The first mark is the Hibernia which identifies the country of origin as Ireland. The second mark is the Crowned Harp mark is the fineness mark which denotes the quality of the silver as 925. The third mark is the date mark which in this case is the cursive Q identifying the year of manufacture as 2000.Here are photos of the finished pipes. The first is the Dublin Silver Cap 150 Bulldog. The first picture shows the box end with the shape number and the pipe shop price of the pipe new. The dimensions of the pipe are: Length: 5 1/2 inches, Height: 2 inches (including the cap) Diameter of the Bowl: 1 ¼ inches, Diameter of the Chamber: 3/4 inches. This is a beautiful pipe and will be going on the rebornpipes store. If you are interested in adding it to your collection have a look there. The second pipe is the Dublin Silver Cap 106 Billiard. The first picture shows the box end with the shape number and the pipe shop price of the pipe new. The dimensions of the pipe are: Length: 6 inches, Height: 2 1/8 inches (including the cap) Diameter of the Bowl: 1 1/2 inches, Diameter of the Chamber: 3/4 inches. This is another beautiful pipe and it will also be going on the rebornpipes store. If you are interested in adding it to your collection have a look there. Both of these are beautiful pipes and will be worthy additions to a Peterson’s Collector’s rack. They have stunning grain and polished silver. The combination looks really good with the black of the stem and silver inset P on the left side of the stems. They are new old stock (NOS) and have never been smoked or even handled much since 2000. If you would like to add one of both to your collection let me know via email to slaug@uniserve.com or send me a message on Facebook. Thanks for looking.