Author Archives: upshallfan

Sasieni “Regent” Four Dot Restoration


By Al Jones

It appears that I’m on a Sasieni roll to start out the new year! My second Sasieni restoration for the day, this one a Regent shape in the Ruff-Root finish. I was delighted to unpack this one, as I had never seen a Regent shape first hand. The seller didn’t include any size references and I assumed it would be of the larger variety, like the the Stratford, Viscount Lascelles, etc. As someone who enjoys a smaller sized bent billiard, this one is perfect at 35 grams. The pipe was inaccurately listed as a “4 Dot” but thankfully a good nomenclature picture was included. Others may have noticed as there was a flurry of bids at the end of the auction. I was fortunate to prevail by a few dollars under my maximum bid.

The pipe was as pictured below, in excellent condition. A good snug stem, no bite marks or any other issues. There was some build-up on the bowl top, a heavy cake and an oxidized stem. Even on the oxidized stem, the blue dots were brilliant and it was one of the nicest Sasieni stems that I’ve seen in quite a while. This pipe was made between 1946 and 1979 (the Family era).

I reamed the cake and soaked the bowl in sea salt and alcohol. Following the soak, I removed the build-up on the bowl top with a piece of Scotch-Brite. I hand buffed the briar with Halycon wax. The stem was mounted and oxidation removed with 800, 1000, 1500 and 2000 grit wet sandpaper. I then used 8,000 and 12,000 micromesh sheets. The stem was polished with White Diamond and Meguiars Plastic Polish.

Below is the finished pipe.

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Kaywoodie Drinkless Yacht Restoration


By Al Jones

Al_Pipes_@SMALL

This wonderful Kaywoodie Drinkless belongs to a friend who lives in Louisiana.  While visiting my daughter for Christmas, he showed me the pipe, found in a local flea market.  I volunteered to restore it for him.

I had not restored a Kaywoodie in several years and struggled a bit to date the pipe.  The old Kaywoodie forum is no longer available, which was a great resource.  I did find that there is a Kaywoodie Pipe Smokers Facebook page and I requested to join it.  Looking back thru some old PipesMagazine.com forum posts, I was finally able to date the pipe as to have been made between 1929 and 1932.    These details led me to that conclusion:

Clover Stem logo – on top of the stem (most I found on line are on the side)
Four Hole Stinger – with Reg. No 213698 and Drinkless
Syncrostem “”PAT. APP. FOR” (Patent was granted in 1933)
KBB logo – in the cloverleaf

The pipe was in great shape, with some rim damage and a lightly oxidized stem.  the Four Hole stinger was intact and the stem was in great shape.  The nomenclature was very good, but unfortunately the shape number was not visible.  Below is the pipe as it was received.

Kaywoodie_Yacht_Before (1)Kaywoodie_Yacht_Before (2)Kaywoodie_Yacht_Before (3)Kaywoodie_Yacht_Before (4)

I used a worn piece of Scotch-Brite to remove the build-up on the bowl top. There were several indentions on the bowl top, I presume heat damage from a lighter or match.  I decided to top the bowl slightly and did so with 320 grain paper on my flat bench, followed by 800 grit wet paper.  This was a bit of a compromise, as I wanted to remove the damage, but not alter the bowl height significantly.  The bowl top was then re-stained with Fieblings Medium Brown stain.  The bowl was reamed and then soaked with alcohol and sea salt.   The bowl was in excellent condition.

I cleaned the stinger with fine steel wool and Mothers Mag & Aluminum polish.  The stem was polished with 800, 1,000, 1,500 and 2,000 grade wet paper, followed by 8,000 and 12,000 grade Micromesh sheets.  It was then polished with White Diamond and Meguiars Plastic polish.

The bowl was buffed with White Diamond and several coats of Carnuba wax.

Below is the finished pipe, ready to head back home to Louisiana.

Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_01Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_02Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_03Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_04Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_05Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_06Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_07Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_08Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_09Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_10Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_11Kaywoodie_Yacht_Finish_12

Sasieni Danzey Natural Restoration


By Al Jones

As a collector of Sasieni Bulldog and Rhodesian shapes, the Danzey was a shape that has so far eluded me. My buddy Dave has a Danzey,also with the SXS stamp and in Rustic finish. I restored that pipe for him in 2017.

This one is a Natural finish grade and it is a wonderful piece of briar. The nomenclature was also in excellent condition. The SXS stands for:
S – saddle stem
XS – Sasieni used this stamp for premium priced pipe (according to Pipepedia)

I would date this pipe to have been made between 1946 and 1979.

The pipe was in fine condition, with some build-up on the rim top and an oxidized stem. It appeared to be an easy restoration, see the before pictures below.

I reamed the slight cake from the bowl and indeed, it was in great shape. The bowl was soaked with Sea Salt and alcohol. After the bowl soak, I removed the build-up on the bowl top with a worn piece of Scotch-Brite. The stem was then mounted and oxidation removed with 800, 1000, 1500 and 2000 grit wet sandpaper. I then used 8,000 and 12,000 micromesh sheets. The stem was polished with White Diamond and Meguiars Plastic Polish. The briar was polished with White Diamond and several coats of carnuba wax.

Below is the finished pipe.

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Comoy’s 283 Grand Slam Restoration


By Al Jones

The 283 is an iconic Rhodesian shape for Comoy’s and one of my favorites. Later in the Comoy’s catalog, this shape number switched to the 440, but no explanation is provided for that change. This one popped up on Ebay and I was able to strike a deal with the seller. The ad had only a small number of fuzzy pictures but to my eye, it showed promise. This one was a Grand Slam, but with some nomenclature details I’d not seen on previous models that I had restored.

Having recently worked on a Comoy’s Grand Slam, I noticed that there was some significant differences on the nomenclature. Below is the stamping on the 283. I posted a thread on the PipesMagazine.com forum asking for some help on dating this particular pipe. Member “doctorbob”, a frequent contributor in the British section offered the following comments, which helps date the pipe to an early post-WWII period. The round, “Made In London” England was used from the mid 40’s to the late 1970’s (up to the transition point).

The second pipe is most likely a very early post-war pipe. The difference in patent numbers was not era based, instead Comoy’s used the appropriate stamp for the recipient market (2001612 was the US patent). The second pipe was intended to be sold in the UK. The time overlap between that particular COM and the patent stamping was apparently quite short.

To further add, the US patent for the ‘Grand Slam’ apparatus was approved in 1935 and expired in June of 1953. US market pipes after that would not have born the patent stamp. The UK patent was roughly contemporary.

It is not known with ANY certainty when the Made in London England stamp started, but it is commonly accepted to have begun being used in the 1945-1950 time frame

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The pipe was in very good condition as received. The stem was oxidized, but with no serious teeth marks. There were several dings around the bowl. There was some rim darkening, but the beveled edge was largely intact. There was very little cake build up in the bowl.

I reamed the cake and soaked it with alcohol and cotton balls. While the bowl was soaking, the stem was soaked in a mild solution of Oxy-Clean, with a dab of grease on the C.

Following the soak, I used a piece of 2,000 grade sandpaper to lighten the rim darkening, followed by 8,000 grade micromesh. I used an electric iron and a wet cloth to steam out some of the dents in the briar.

The stem was mounted and oxidation removed with 800, 1,000, 1,500 and 2,000 grade sandpaper, followed by 8,000 and 12,000 grade micromesh. It was then buffed with White Diamond and Meguiars Plastic Polish. The bowl was buffed with White Diamond and several coats of Carnuba wax, showing great care around the nomenclature.

Below is the finished pipe.

Comoy’s 237 Grand Slam Restoration


By Al Jones

This pipe was a couple of firsts for me. I’ve restored a number of Comoy’s bulldog shapes, but this is the first shape 237 that I’ve encountered. I’ve also had several “Grand Slam” pipes, but this was the first one that still had the patented filter apparatus.

The Grand Slam was introduced in 1933, and was in the Comoy’s catalog until the 1970’s. This one has the COM stamp of the latter years, from 1946-1981. Below is a catalog page for Grand Slam pipes from 1936.

The pipe appeared to have been heavily smoked, with a thick cake. Surprisingly, the stem had zero teeth marks and only a heavy layer of oxidation. The bowl had numerous dings and dents that would need to be removed. Below is the pipe as it was received.

After removing the stem, I discovered the original stinger apparatus which still included two leather washers. This pipe is stamped *7 and replacement washers were available in that size. The stinger was stuck fast in the tenon. I soaked it in a shot glass of alcohol, but that wasn’t enough to get it unscrewed. I was able to run some alcohol bristle cleaners down through the stem and that did finally allow the stinger to be unscrewed. Once the stinger was removed, the stem was soaked in a mild Oxy-Clean solution, with a dab of grease over the drilled C stem logo.

The build-up on the top of the bowl was removed with a worn piece of scotch-brite. I steamed out most of the dents around the bowl with an electric iron and a wet cloth. The bowl was then polished with White Diamond rouge and several coats of carnuba wax.

The stem was mounted and the initial layer of oxidation removed with 400 grit wet paper, followed by 800, 1,000, 1,500 and 2,000 grades. Next up was micromesh sheets in 8,000 and 12,000 grades. The stem was then buffed with White Diamond followed by Meguiars Plastic Polish.

Below is the finished pipe.

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Comoy’s 434 Liverpool Restoration


By Al Jones

The second Comoy’s on my bench this weekend was a little bit of a mystery. This one also didn’t require a lot of work, but the nomenclature was all but invisible. With a magnifying loupe, I think it is a three digit shape, starting with a 4. I found a shape 434, at SmokingPipes, which is a round shape Liverpool. So, I believe this pipe is also a shape 434, but the finish is undetermined (probably a tradition). The pipe has the three-piece C stem logo, so it was made before 1981. Below we see the shape example from SmokingPipes (this one a Blue Riband!)

Below is the pipe as received. There was a heavy layer of oxidation on the stem, with a few teeth indentions. A heavy layer of build-up was on the bowl-top and it had a very thick cake in the bowl. Tobacco buildup in the shank prevented the stem from being inserted flush.

I used a lighter to lift the teeth indentions on both sides of the stem. A worn scotchbrite was used to remove the build-up on the bowl top. The bowl was reamed, then soaked with alcohol and sea salt. While the bowl was soaking, the stem was soaked in a mild oxy-clean solution. I put a dab of grease on the C stem logo.

Following the soak, the shank was cleaned and stem inserted. Now that the shank was clean, the stem was able to be inserted flush and it had a nice, snug fit. I removed the oxidation with 400, 800, 1,000, 1,500 and 2,000 grade wet paper, followed by 8,000 micromesh. The stem was then polished with White Diamond and Meguiars plastic polish.

The bowl was buffed with White Diamond and several coats of Carnuba wax. Below is the finished pipe.

Comoy’s Golden Grain Bulldog Restoration


By Al Jones

This 409 Bulldog Golden Grain found its way to my work bench this weekend. The 409 is the most popular Comoy’s bulldog, but I’ve only worked in three versions of this shape in the past seven years. It’s not certain when the Golden Grain entered the Comoy’s line up. The COM and three-piece C stem logo were used from 1946 to the merger in 1981.

The pipe had some build-up on the bowl and the stem was heavily oxidized, but overall, it held a lot of promise for a restoration. Below is the pipe as received.

I used a piece of worn scotchbrite to remove the build-up on the bowl top. The bowl was reamed which revealed that the bowl interior was in very good condition. The bowl was soaked in alcohol and sea salt. I picked up an old Sugar dispenser for filling the bowl with salt, which worked very well (sealed with a piece of tape to keep the salt dry). While the bowl was soaking, the stem was soaked in some mild oxy-clean solution. I put a dab of grease on the C stem logo.

Following the soak, the shank was cleaned and stem inserted. I removed the oxidation with 400, 800, 1,000, 1,500 and 2,000 grade wet paper, followed by 8,000 micromesh. The stem was then polished with White Diamond and Meguiars plastic polish.

The bowl was buffed with White Diamond and several coats of Carnuba wax. Below is the finished pipe.

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