Daily Archives: May 23, 2020

Restoring another Jobey Dansk 3 Freehand


Blog by Steve Laug

My brother Jeff picked up another Jobey Dansk 3 freehand pipe on one of his adventures pipe hunting. It had really nice grain and plateau on the top of the rim and on the end of the shank. It came with a Jobey Dansk Pipe Sock. There were rusticated spots on the right side and back of the bowl and top of the shank as well as the heel of the bowl. There was something familiar about the style of carving that reminded me of other Danish Freehand pipes I have worked on. I seemed to remember that Jobey Dansk pipes were carved by Karl Erik. The finish on this pipe was dirty with dust and lava on the plateau top. The bowl was lined with a thick cake. There was thick dust in the rustication around the bowl and shank as well as the plateau on the shank end. The smooth finish was also dirty and dull looking. The stem is a turned fancy turned vulcanite stem. The fit of the stem to the shank was snug. There were tooth marks on both sides of the stem at the button and on the smooth parts of the button on both sides. Otherwise it was a very clean stem. Jeff took of the pipe to show the overall condition of the bowl and stem. He took close up photos of the bowl and rim top from different angles to show the condition of the plateau finish. You can see the lava and build up on the rim top and the lava flowing over the inner edge of the bowl onto the plateau. It is hard to know if there is damage or if the lava protected it. The bowl has a thick cake that lining the walls and overflowing into lava.He took photos of the sides and heel of the bowl to show the lay of the grain and the rustication around the pipe. It is a nice piece of briar. The top of the bowl is craggy and rugged looking. Unique!Jeff took a photo of the stamping on the underside of the shank to capture it. It was clear and read Jobey Dansk at the top. Under that it read Handmade in Denmark followed by a large number 3.The next photos show the condition of the vulcanite stem. The first photo shows flow of the stem as a whole. You can see the tooth marks and damage both on the surface of both sides. I wanted to look at who had carved the Jobey Dansk line to confirm some suspicions I had about it. I had a feeling that the pipes were carved by a Danish carver known as Karl Erik. I looked up the Jobey listing on Pipedia (https://pipedia.org/wiki/Jobey) and found the following information. I quote a portion of the article that is pertinent as follows.

English – American – Danish – French… Information about the brand Jobey are only to be found in form of smithereens…

Probably established in England around 1920(?) the brand hiked into the USA later. In the course of time owner, distributor and manufacturer changed repeatedly. As far as known:

George Yale Pipes & Tobacco, New York (1942)

Norwalk Pipe Co., New York (1949)

Arlington Briar Pipes Corp., Brooklyn (when?)

Hollco International, New York (1969).

Weber Pipe Co., Jersey City, NJ (1970’s)

The Tinder Box, (1970’s – 80’s).

Throughout decades Jobey pipes were mainly sold in the USA, Canada and England but remained almost unknown in continental Europe. The bulk of Jobeys was predominantly made according to classical patterns and mainly in the lower to middle price range. The predominant judgment of the pipe smokers reads: “A well-made pipe for the price.” So there is hardly anything very special or exciting about Jobey pipes although a flyer from ca. 1970 assures: “The briar root Jobey insists upon for its peer of pipes is left untouched to grow, harden and sweeten for 100 years. […]Jobey uses only the heart of this century old briar and only one out of 500 bowls turned measures up to the rigid Jobey specifications.” 99.80% of cull… that makes the layman marveling!

From that information, my suspicions were confirmed. The pipe that I was working on was carved by Karl Erik Ottendahl. There were some similarities to the Karl Erik pipes that I have worked on in the past. The dating of the pipe line in the 70s fits well with the pipe I have in hand. I took some photos of the pipe before I started my part of the restoration.

Now that I was reminded about the Karl Erik Ottendahl connection it was time to work on the pipe on my end. When I received it Jeff had once again done an amazing job cleaning the pipe. He reamed it with a PipNet pipe reamer and got rid of the cake. He cleaned up the reaming with a Savinelli Fitsall Pipe Knife so that we could see the walls of the bowl and assess for damage. He cleaned the internals of the shank and stem with alcohol, pipe cleaners and alcohol. He scrubbed the exterior with undiluted Murphy’s Oil Soap and a tooth brush. He rinsed the pipe under warm water. He dried it off with a cloth and then let it air dry. The stem was scrubbed with Soft Scrub and soaked in Before & After Deoxidizer. It came out looking very good. The finish on the bowl and the rim top cleaned up nicely. I took pictures of the pipe to show how it looked when I unpacked it. I took some photos of the rim top and stem to show the condition of them both when the pipe arrived. Overall it looked good. There is some darkening and damage to the inner edge of the bowl. The stem had some deep tooth marks ahead of the button and on the button surface on both sides.I took a photo of the stamping on the underside of the shank. It is readable and in great condition.I removed the stem from the shank and took a photo of the pipe to show the look of the pipe.I polished the bowl with micromesh sanding pads – wet sanding with 1500-12000 grit pads. I wiped the briar down after each pad with a damp cloth. The bowl is starting to look very good. With the polishing finished I used a Black stain pen to fill in the crevices of the plateau top and give some contrast to the smooth high spots. I like this look as it give the pipe a sense of dimensionality. I worked some Before & After Restoration Balm into the surface of the briar with my fingertips and into the plateau rim top and shank end with a horsehair shoe brush to clean, enliven and protect it. I let the balm sit for a little while and then buffed with a cotton cloth to raise the shine. The photos show the bowl at this point in the restoration process. I set the bowl aside and turned my attention to the stem. The stem was very clean so I filled in the tooth marks and built up the button with clear super glue and set it aside to cure. The second photo is blurry but still is clear enough to see the filled in area. Once it had cured I flattened out the repairs and sharpened the edge of the button with a needle file. I sanded out the tooth chatter and blended in the repairs with 220 grit sandpaper and started to polish it with a folded piece of 400 wet dry sandpaper. Once it was finished it began to shine.I polished the stem with micromesh sanding pads – wet sanding with 1500-12000 grit sanding pads. I wiped it down after each sanding pad with some Obsidian Oil. I finished polishing it with Before & After Pipe Stem Polish – both Fine and Extra Fine and buffed it off with a cotton cloth. This is a beautiful Jobey Dansk Hand Made by Karl Erik with a fancy, turned, black vulcanite stem. It has a great look and feel. The shape fits well in the hand with the curve of the bowl and shank junction a perfect fit for the thumb around the bowl when held. I polished stem and the bowl with Blue Diamond polish on the buffing wheel. I gave the plateau on the rim top and shank end multiple coats of Conservator’s Wax. I gave the bowl and the stem multiple coats of carnauba wax. I buffed the pipe with a clean buffing pad to raise the shine. I hand buffed it with a microfiber cloth to deepen the shine. The pipe polished up pretty nicely. The rich combination of browns and black in the smooth finishes and the plateau areas took on life with the buffing. The rich colour of the briar works well with the polished vulcanite stem. I like the grain and finished look of this Jobey Dansk pipe. Have a look at it with the photos below. The shape, finish and flow of the pipe and stem are very well done. The dimensions are Length: 5 ½ inches, Height: 2 inches, Outside diameter of the bowl: 1 ¼ wide, Chamber diameter: ¾ of an inch. This Danish Freehand is a real beauty. Thanks for walking through the restoration with me as I worked over another beautiful pipe. This one will be going on the rebornpipes store in the Danish Pipe Making Section shortly if you would like to add it to your collection. Thanks for your time.

My Final Restoration from Bulgaria – A Find in Athens: Refreshing a Fun Lorenzo Carnevale San Remo Italy 8672 Apple


Blog by Dal Stanton

A personal note:  After living over 25 years in Europe and the past 14 in Sofia, Bulgaria, this restoration marks my final offering from Bulgaria as my wife and I transition to the US and will be basing in Denver, Colorado.  We will miss Bulgaria deeply and the work we have devoted our lives to.  Yet, after a hiatus for the move, I will continue to collect and restore pipes benefiting the Daughters of Bulgaria – women and girls who have been trafficked and sexually exploited.   

While living in Bulgaria, I’ve had the opportunity on several occasions to visit our neighbor to the south, Greece.  I was in Athens, Greece, a few years ago, and this story unfolded which I repeat here.  I was tooling through the Monastirski Market area at the foot of the Acropolis, next door to the Forum.  As I explored, I found one shop nestled on a tree-covered side street with a table set on the front sidewalk with all kinds of paraphernalia. It drew me like a bee to pollen!  Two congenial men were sitting behind the table conversing in Greek. I assumed they chatted about all manner of life, family, politics…, and what is usually the case, as I drew near, their conversation stopped, and the English began.  As I perused the table with strategic disinterest, I saw one pipe on the table that did not grab me too much.  The shop owner asked me if I was interested in pipes?  I said yes, and he said that he had many more that he didn’t know what to do with…. “Oh, my…” – my heart skipped a beat!  In his wonderfully, friendly, thick Greek accent and manner of hospitality, he said, ‘Come with me.”  As he pulled a chain out of this pocket a full ring of keys followed. He led me down a narrow, alley walkway along the side of the shop.  We stopped and he unlocked a side door that led immediately up the stairs to an ‘upper room’ where, as he explained with a subdued, secretive flourish, he seldom brought customers.  When we entered the room, I saw why.  It was his special place – family pictures were arrayed everywhere; icons of the Greek Orthodox Church were given special deference as they hung from places of honor. Many shelves full of his collections.  He pulled my attention away from the array to a slew of pipes displayed in a case hanging on the wall and arranged beneath on a cluttered table.

I took it all in.  He explained that his good friend, from Armenia, asked him to sell off his collection of pipes and he gave me a price for everything, including the wall-hanging display case.  With gratitude to him for his generous offer, I had to decline as I was flying back to Sofia and would have no room in my luggage for all of it.  I suggested to him that his friend could possibly make more money if he sold the pipes and case separately and he confided that he knew little about pricing pipes individually.  As we talked, I discovered that he was a board member of a foundation that assisted orphaned children Armenia – the home of his friend.  That opened the door for me to share that I too, was a board member of the Daughters of Bulgaria Foundation and I shared with him why I collected pipes – to restore and sell them to benefit the Daughters and their children.  He encouraged me to go through the collection and pull out pipes that interested me and make him an offer.  In Mediterranean culture, very much like Bulgarian culture – relationship is supreme, and we had talked of things near and dear to our hearts.  Pipes became the doorway to a deeper fellowship that we both understood and appreciated.   I left the shop owner with a firm handshake, a parting picture, and an appreciation for him and his journey.

I also left his shop with some special pipes and friendly prices 😊.  The Lorenzo Carnevale Sanremo of Italy (above), now on my worktable, a Savinelli Roley Pocket Pipe (below), and a sorry looking Bent Billiard (center) that appeared to have no name – at least in the dim light of the upper room, I could not see any, but later I discovered it was a Savinelli Oscar.

The Lorenzo Carnevale along with the other pipes, traveled back to Sofia with me and were posted in the For “Pipe Dreamers” Only! online collection where Nathan saw it and commissioned it along with 3 other pipes – Comoy’s Sunrise Volcano, Savinelli Dry System 3621 Blasted, and a French Pipstar Standard 06 026 Dublin Sitter.

The ‘fun’ Lorenzo Carnevale is the last of the four pipes commissioned by Nathan benefiting the Daughters of Bulgaria.  I call it ‘fun’ because it shows some entertaining attitude!  And here are pictures that got Nathan’s attention. The nomenclature is stamped on the underside of the shank amid the rusticated surface.  It is stamped with a fancy cursive ‘Lorenzo’ [over] CARNEVALE [over] SANREMO with ITALY offset to the right below.  The Lorenzo stem stamp is a classic cursive ‘L’ which appears to be gold lettering.“Carnevale” is the obvious Italian word for ‘carnival’ which sets the tempo for this rusticated Apple shaped pipe with a festive split two-toned slightly bent acrylic stem showing blues and reds. The pipe challenges you to smile!  Its diminutive size is length: 5 1/4 inches, height 1 1/4 inches, bowl width: 1 1/4 inches, chamber width: 7/8 inches, and chamber depth: 1 1/8 inches.

Not as familiar with Lorenzo as I am with other prominent Italian pipe makers, I was interested to read Pipedia’s Lorenzo article:

Following Rossi (1886 in Barasso) and Ceresa (1897 in Cassano Magnano) the third pipe manufacture in the Lombardian province of Varese was established in 1900 in the picturesque city of Gallarate by two brothers. Fratelli Lana (Lana Bros.) produced briar pipes for the Italian market under their own brand name.

In 1922 Fratelli Lana went into a close co-operation with the merchant’s family Tagliabue from Milano. Sales outside of Italy began immediately and the demand throughout Europe steadily increased. By 1939 the manufacture had grown to factory size with 120 persons employed – a considerable number for the time. The program remained unchanged for decades: cheap, unpretentious budget pipes for the mass markets. Most of them didn’t even have any stampings besides “Genuine Bruyere” or similar. A large share of the production emerged as fabrications for other firms so that an own style of the Lana pipes was hardly recognizable.

From 1969 on Lorenzo Tagliabue changed the brand’s name to Lorenzo Pipes. The reason currently qouted is another pipemaking firm named Tagliabue.

This next excerpt I found especially interesting because I had known that Lorenzo pipes tended to be on the ‘edgy’ side of things:

Lorenzo Pipes became cult throughout the 1970s and 1980s. In order to strive another cliche than the gentleman with the stronger statue: the pipesmoking university student of these years, clothed in turtleneck pullover and NATO-parka, can actually not be conceived without a Lorenzo! Well, to be sure he had to select his Lorenzo very carefully from the show-cases in order to find one with less than six blinking fills. Lorenzo dealt very generously with putty. All the same, the pipes smoked very good-natured, they were considered to be hypermodern and flamboyant and, perhaps best of all, they gave you the indispensable highbrow touch!

the Pipedia article describes also that after a family crisis in 1983, Lorenzo Tagliabue lost all interest in the company and it was acquired for a time by Comoy’s of London, but today it is under the ownership of the Aliverti family when in 1988 all rights were purchased to the Lorenzo trademark from the Tagliabue family and production of the renown Lorenzo Pipes resumed.

The nomenclature of the Carnevale mentions a city: Sanremo.  Not sure why a city was mentioned whether it had to do with the history of Lorenzo pipes or some other reason, but I did a quick search on the internet to find out.  It didn’t take long to understand the Carnevale name.  Sanremo is known in Italy for its annual ‘Carnival of Flowers’.    The Wikipedia article was very helpful.  This history of this annual festival in March goes back to 1904.  As a celebration of flowers, the main event is a parade made up primarily of ‘floral carriages’ or floats very reminiscent to me of California’s Rose Parade. (Picture: LINK)

With a better understanding of the pipe now on my worktable, the pipe itself seems to be in good shape.  It needs cleaning.  There is a shelf of cake in the upper chamber but then it seems to widen out going toward the floor.  The aft side of the rim is darkened from lighting the chamber.  The acrylic stem has little chatter but is rough.  Sanding should smooth it out.  Here are few pictures of the issues. I begin the refreshing by giving the pipe a general cleaning.  Starting with the stem, I clean the acrylic stem’s airway using pipe cleaners wetted with isopropyl 95%.  It takes one pipe cleaner to confirm a clean airway.Next, the chamber is cleaned using the Pipnet Reaming Kit.  I use 2 of the 4 blades available.  The cake is light.  I transition to the Savinelli Fitsall Tool to give the chamber walls a quick scraping.  Finally, the chamber is sanded with 240 grade paper wrapped around a Sharpie Pen.  After wiping out the chamber, an inspection confirms no heating problems. To begin the cleaning of the external rusticated surface of the Apple shaped bowl, undiluted Murphy’s Oil Soap is used with a cotton pad.  A bristled toothbrush also helps to clean the rusticated surface.  The brass bristled brush helps also to clean the darkened area on the rim. After a time of scrubbing, the stummel is transferred to the kitchen sink to start cleaning the internals. Using the shank brushes and anti-oil liquid dish soap I scrub the internal mortise and airway.  After a thorough rinsing, the stummel is back on the worktable.Next, to continue the internal cleaning, one cotton bud and one pipe cleaner wetted with isopropyl 95% confirm the internals are clean!  Nice for a change.With the rusticated surface, to clean the internal rim edge I use a roll 240 grade paper to address the darker area on the backside of the rim.  That is much better. Next, with the surface cleaned and the rim freshened, I apply Mark Hoover’s product, Before & After Restoration Balm to the rusticated Apple bowl.  I put a little on my fingers and I work it into the briar surface well.  It starts as a cream and then thickens to a wax-like consistency as it’s worked into the briar.  After applying the Balm, I put the stummel aside for 15 or so minutes for the Balm to be absorbed.  The picture shows this period.  Afterwards, I buff the bowl with a microfiber cloth to clear the excess and raise the buffed shine of the stummel.  I like what the Balm does.  The style of the rustication, more of a pitting, does not show a lot of grain but the Balm deepens the entire surface presentation. Turning to the stem, there is little tooth chatter but more of a roughness on the bit where there has been gentle use.I use 240 grade paper to sand out the bit. A flat needle file also refreshes the lines of the button.  The sanding is expanded with 240 paper to the edge of the saddle to address random scratches and to have a uniform treatment of the lower stem. From the 240 sanding paper, I now wet sand with 600 grade paper up to the saddle and then follow with an application of 000 steel wool.Moving now to the full regimen of micromesh pads, I wet sand the entire stem with pads 1500 to 2400.  Following this, I dry sand with pads 3200 to 4000 and 6000 to 12000.  Between each set of 3 pads, Obsidian Oil is applied.  I’m not sure it does anything for the acrylic, but I apply it anyway.  The micromesh process does a great job bringing out the acrylic ‘pop’! Now on the home stretch.  After reuniting the stem and stummel, a cotton cloth buffing wheel is mounted to the Dremel with the speed set at the lowest speed, Blue Diamond compound is applied to the stem only.  I set the Dremel to the lowest speed because I don’t want to risk overheating and having melted the acrylic with too much friction with the abrasive compound.  I keep the wheel rotating and don’t sit on one spot for long. I also don’t apply the compound to the rusticated stummel because I don’t want to fill all the rustication pits with compound dust!  That would not be easy to clean.After the compound, another cotton cloth wheel is mounted on the Dremel with the speed set at 40% full power.  Carnauba wax is then applied to both stem and stummel.  I’m not concerned about the wax on the stummel.  I keep the application light and I’m careful to spread and dissolve the wax into the briar with the buffing action of the Dremel.  After applying the wax, the pipe receives a hearty hand buffing to dispense wax that wasn’t assimilated and to raise the shine.This was an easy but fun restoration.  The Lorenzo Carnevale Sanremo Apple lives up to the Lorenzo reputation of producing pipes that are ‘edgy’.  The saddle tan rusticated Apple bowl is expressive and when tied to the two-toned red and blue acrylic stem, the pipe truly expresses the carnival theme of colors and flowers commemorating the well-known festival in Sanremo, Italy.  This fun pipe was a good conclusion to the 4 pipes Nathan commissioned from the For “Pipe Dreamers” Only offerings.  Nathan has the first opportunity to acquire the Lorenzo Carnavale Sanremo Apple from The Pipe Steward Store benefiting the Daughters of Bulgaria – women and girls who have been trafficked and sexually exploited.  Thanks for joining me!

Fresh Life for a Bari De Luxe 9763 Bent Dublinesque Freehand


Blog by Steve Laug

The next pipe on the work table is a sandblast bent Dublin shaped Bari, at least that is my description of it. The bowl is round with a crowned rim top. On the underside of the shank it reads Bari over De Luxe followed by Made In Denmark and ends with the shape number 9763. The finish is sandblasted on the entire bowl and the blast is deep and tactile with some great grain as well. The rim top is sandblasted and crowned. The pipe was dirty and the oxblood finish flat but otherwise the pipe was in good shape. The bowl had a thick cake and the inner edge of the rim looked to be in good condition. The shank is round and flows out the bowl with a slight bend. The stem is vulcanite and has a fancy round turning before second round edged rectangular bead. The blade of the stem is also a round edge rectangle. It is stamped on the left side of the stem and reads Bari. The stem had tooth marks and chatter on both sides near the button. It was oxidized and had some calcification on the end. Jeff took some photos of the pipe to show the general condition of the pipe before he started his clean up. Jeff took some close-up photos of the rim top and bowl to show the overall condition. There is some light lava in some of the grooves but overall it is just dusty. The edges look very good.He took some photos of the sides and heel of the bowl to show the condition of the finish on the pipe. The photos show the beautiful grain around the bowl. Under the dust and grime it was a nice looking bowl. I think it will be a beautiful pipe once it is restored.He took a photo of the stamping on the underside of the shank. It was stamped Bari over De Luxe followed by Made in Denmark and the shape number 9763.The next two photos show the top and underside of the stem. It is dirty and has calcification on both sides at the button. There is also some tooth chatter and some light tooth marks.I have worked on quite a few Bari’s in the past and did the work on the brand information so rather than rework all of that I am including the information I found while working on a Bari De Luxe Freehand. I quoted a section from Pipedia on Bari pipes (https://pipedia.org/wiki/Bari). I am including the material that I found previously on the brand. It is good to be reminded of the fact that Viggo Nielsen was the pipe maker. I quote:

Pipedia states that Bari Piber was founded by Viggo Nielsen in Kolding, Denmark around the turn of 1950/51. His sons Kai and Jørgen both grew into their father’s business from a very young age and worked there till 1975. Both have become successful pipe makers.

Bari successfully adapted the new Danish design that had been started mainly by Stanwell for its own models. Bari was sold in 1978 to Van Eicken Tobaccos in Hamburg, Germany though the pipes were still made in Denmark. From 1978 to 1993 Åge Bogelund and Helmer Thomsen headed Bari’s pipe production.

Helmer Thomson bought the company in 1993 re-naming it to “Bari Piber Helmer Thomsen”. The workshop moved to more convenient buildings in Vejen. Bogelund, who created very respectable freehands of his own during the time at Bari got lost somehow after 1993. Bari’s basic conception fundamentally stayed the same for decades: series pipes pre-worked by machines and carefully finished by hand – thus no spectacular highgrades but solid, reliable every day’s companions were what they turned out. The most famous series are the smooth “Classic Diamond” and the blasted “Wiking”.

Now that I was reminded about the Viggo Nielsen connection it was time to work on the pipe on my end. When I received it Jeff had once again done an amazing job cleaning the pipe. He reamed it with a PipNet pipe reamer and got rid of the cake. He cleaned up the reaming with a Savinelli Fitsall Pipe Knife so that we could see the walls of the bowl and assess for damage. He cleaned the internals of the shank and stem with alcohol, pipe cleaners and alcohol. He scrubbed the exterior with undiluted Murphy’s Oil Soap and a tooth brush. He rinsed the pipe under warm water. He dried it off with a cloth and then let it air dry. The stem was scrubbed with Soft Scrub and soaked in Before & After Deoxidizer. It came out looking very good. The finish on the bowl and the rim top cleaned up nicely. I took pictures of the pipe to show how it looked when I unpacked it. I took a close up photo of the rim top to show how clean the sandblast was. The inner edge of the rim and the ridges and valleys of the blast looked good. The stem looked good just some light tooth chatter and light tooth marks near the button.I took a photo of the stamping on the underside of the shank and the Bari stamp on the left side of the saddle stem.I took the stem off the bowl and took a picture of the pipe to show the flow of the bowl and the angles of the stem and shank. It is a great looking pipe.The pipe was in excellent condition so I started with the bowl. I worked some Before & After Restoration Balm into the smooth briar with my fingertips and a horsehair shoe brush. The product is a great addition to the restoration work. It enlivens, enriches and protects the briar while giving it a deep glow. I appreciate Mark Hoover’s work in developing this product. I set the bowl aside and turned my attention to the stem. I sanded the surface of the stem with 220 grit sandpaper to remove the tooth marks and chatter. I started the polishing process with 400 grit wet dry sandpaper.I polished the stem with micromesh sanding pads – wet sanding with 1500-12000 grit sanding pads. I wiped it down after each sanding pad with Obsidian Oil. I polished it with Before & After Pipe Stem Polish – both Fine and Extra Fine. I buffed the stem with a soft cloth to raise the shine. I am on the homestretch with this Bari De Luxe. As always I am excited to finish a pipe that I am working on. I put the pipe back together and lightly buffed it with Blue Diamond on the buffing wheel. I used a gentle touch on the sandblast portion of the bowl. I gave the bowl multiple coats of Conservator’s Wax and the stem multiple coats of carnauba wax. I buffed the pipe with a clean buffing pad and hand buffed it to raise the shine. It is fun to see what the polished bowl looks like along with the polished vulcanite stem. This Bari De Luxe 9763 is a nice looking pipe. It is quite comfortable in hand and should be so when smoking. It is quite light and well balanced. Have a look at it with the photos below. The dimensions are Length: 5 inches, Height: 1 ¾ inches, Outside diameter of the bowl: 1 ½ inches, Chamber diameter: ¾ of an inch. It is another beautiful pipe and one that will be residing in my rack at least for a while. I like the shape and feel of this one and I am looking forward to firing up a bowl of Virgina/Perique in it later today! Thanks for walking through the restoration with me as I worked over this pipe. Thanks to each of you who are reading this blog.