Daily Archives: February 21, 2022

Restoring an Aged Real Meerschaum Billiard


Blog by Steve Laug

The next pipe came to me as a referral by a local pipe and cigar shop. I have not met the owner as he left it in my mailbox for me to work on. The well made leather case has no markings or stampings on it. It is just a nicely made, fitted leather case for a meerschaum. Inside the case the lid had a red and gold seal in the lid and read Real Meerschaum arched over an oval with the words Pure Amber Stem arched beneath it. When I open the case the stink was old and musty like the pipe had been sitting in the back of some old timers drawer. It was not moldy smelling but it had that odd smell that I have come to associate with things stored in a damp basement or attic or maybe an old box of stuff. It definitely was musty! The case is fitted to lightweight meerschaum billiard. I took photos of the case before I opened it and of the pipe inside after it was opened. The case has a red oval logo on the lid that read Real Meerschaum arched over Pure Amber Stem. I was looking forward to working on this one and seeing what was underneath the debris and mustiness of time. I took the pipe out of the case. The pipe inside was filthy with a thick overflowing cake in the bowl that reeked of mustiness. There was a thick overflow of tars/lava on the top and inner edge of the bowl The finish was dirty with sticky grime and dust on the surface and no shine at all. There were some spots of hardened tar on the bowl sides as well. Underneath the filth there was some developing patina around the bowl and shank. The stem was really dirty as well. There was dust and debris o the surface and some light dusting that looked like mildew. The surface was hard and in good condition with no bite marks or chatter on either side. The slot had a thick build up of tars like the rim top. It was hard to know what it looked like under the grime but it had the feel of either amber or an Amberoid. The stem had swirls in the amber like the Amberoid I had found on Andreas Bauer Meerschaum pipes. The stem had a threaded bone tenon that was filthy and would need some work but it was in good condition otherwise. I took photos of the pipe before I started my work on it. I took photos of the rim top and the stem to show the condition. You can see the issues on the rim top and stem as I noted above. There are also some light scratches on the rim top itself. It should clean up quite well.I carefully reamed the pipe with a Pipnet Reamer, followed by a Savinelli Fitsall Pipe Knife. There was still some thick cake on the bottom of the bowl that I could not reach or penetrate with the two reamers.I scrubbed the bowl with undiluted Murphy’s Oil Soap with a tooth brush. I worked on the rim top with a Scotch Brite pad to break up the lava coat. I rinsed it under warm water to remove the soap and grime. I then turned back to do some more reaming of the bowl. There was a hard thick coat of cake on the bottom of the bowl. I used a Kleen Reem Pipe reamer to remove the cake on the bottom of the bowl. I sanded out the inside of the bowl with a piece of dowel wrapped with 220 grit sandpaper. I took the cake back to bare meerschaum. I cleaned out the inside of the shank and the airway in the stem with alcohol, cotton swabs and pipe cleaners. I kept at it until I was able to remove the tars and oils and to minimize the mustiness of the smell of both.I polished the smooth meerschaum with micomesh sanding pads – wet sanding with 1500-12000 grit pads. I worked on the darkening of the rim top at the same time. I wiped the bowl down after each pad with a damp cloth. I set the bowl aside and turned my attention to the stem. I polished out the chatter and faint tooth marks with micromesh sanding pads. I dry sanded it with 1500-12000 pads and wiped the bowl down after each pad with a cloth and Obsidian Oil. I finished polished it with Before & After Fine and Extra Fine stem polish. I wiped it down with the cloth and Obsidian Oil one final time and set aside to dry. This No Name Real Meerschaum Billiard with an Amber Taper stem is a beautiful pipe. With the addition of the beeswax the meerschaum took on a slightly darker patina. The polished light weight meerschaum that shines through the polished finish is stunning. I put the stem back on the bowl and carefully buffed the pipe with a clean buffing pad. I hand buffed the pipe with a microfiber cloth to deepen the shine. The finished Meerschaum Billiard fits nicely in the hand and feels great. Give the finished pipe a look in the photos below. The dimensions of the pipe are Length: 5 inches, Height: 1 ½ inches, Outside diameter of the bowl: 1 ¼ inches, Chamber diameter: ¾ of an inch. The weight of the pipe is 24 grams/ .81oz. One I finish posting this blog I will contact the owner and let him know it is finished. Perhaps I will get to meet him when he picks it up but we shall see. In a time of COVID and E-Transfers it is possible to do business without contact. Ah well! Thanks for reading this blog and my reflections on the pipe while I worked on it. There are many more to come!

Replacing a tenon and restoring a House of Robertson Rusticated Dublin


Blog by Steve Laug

The next pipe on the table is a House of Robertson Rusticated Dublin with a tapered, vulcanite Bite Through stem. The rustication on the briar is very tactile and deep. There are grooves around the bowl and shank and those have been deeply rusticated. The pipe is stamped on the left side of the diamond shank and reads House of [over] Robertson. It really is a beautiful pipe and the rustic finish works very well with the diamond twin bore saddle stem. The fellow who sent it to me is a previous customer and in his box were two pipes with a snapped tenon – the Radice (which I have repaired already) and this House of Robertson. This one was quite dirty with a thick cake in the bowl and overflowing onto the rim top. There was some burn damage on the inner edge of the rim around the bowl and the pipe was dull and dusty. The tenon had snapped off cleanly at the shank end with no damage to the briar. The stem had tooth marks on both the top and underside ahead of the button and was also dirty. I took some photos of the pipe before I started my work on it. I took a close up photo of the rim top to show the condition of the bowl and inner edge. You can see the damage on the inner edge of the rim. It will become more evident once the bowl has been reamed and cleaned. The photos of the stem show the tooth marks and chatter on both sides near the button.I took photos of the stamping on the left side of the diamond shank to capture how the classic House of Robertson signature looked.House of Robertson pipes were made by Thayne Robertson in Boise, Idaho. He did some beautiful work and all had the etched stamp on them. I have worked on many of these pipes over the years and done the research on the brand previously. Here is a link to one of the pipes where I have included background information (https://rebornpipes.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=60954&action=edit&classic-editor).

“House of Robertson” was in business for many years, but alas, closed their doors in 1999. They were located in Boise, Idaho. They are noted for making rather large and interesting pipes. Thayne Robertson was a Master Mason, AF & AM, and started the shop about 1947 and his son Jon started working there in 1970 when he finished college, along with Thayne’s daughter. Thayne and his son started making the big pipes at that time, and made them together until 1987 when Thayne passed away. Jon kept the store and his sister moved on to other things. The House of Robertson appears to have closed around 1999. https://pipedia.org/wiki/Robertson

I began my work on this pipe by pulling the broken tenon from the shank. I generally use a dry wall screw and twist it into the airway of the broken tenon and wiggle it free. This one was stuck. I put it in the freezer while I had lunch and afterward it came out quite easily. I went through my replacement tenons and found one that would work on this stem. I sanded the broken end of the tenon remaining on the stem with a sanding drum on my Dremel. I also sanded the diameter of the new tenon at the same time to get a good fit in the shank. I took photos of the tenon in the shank at this point to show the fit. I drilled out the airway on the stem with successively larger drill bits to accommodate the tenon. The last bit was ¼ inch which is perfect for the tenon. I slipped the stem over the tenon and took photos of the pipe at this point. It looks very good. With that done I turned my attention to the bowl. I reamed it with a PipNet reamer and took the cake back to briar. I cleaned up the remnants with a Savinelli Fitsall pipe knife. I sanded the bowl walls with a piece of dowel wrapped with 220 grit sandpaper. I cleaned up the rim top with a brass bristle wire brush to remove the lava in the sandblast and a bit of the burn damage on the inner edge of the bowl.I cleaned out the internals on the stem and shank with pipe cleaners, cotton swabs and alcohol until they were clean.I rubbed down the bowl with Before & After Restoration Balm to clean, enliven and protect the briar. I worked it into the blast with a horsehair shoe brush. I let it sit and do its magic for 10 minutes and then buffed it off with a soft cloth.I set the bowl aside and turned my attention to the vulcanite stem. I glued the new tenon in the shank with black super glue. While it cured, I “painted” the surface of the vulcanite stem with the flame of a lighter to lift the tooth chatter and marks. Many of them lifted significantly with the heat. Those that remained I filled in with black super glue and set the stem aside to cure. Once it had cured I flattened out the repairs with a small flat file. I sanded them with 220 grit sandpaper to further flatten them out and blend them into the surrounding area. I started polishing the stem with 400 grit wet dry sandpaper. I polished the vulcanite bite through stem with micromesh sanding pads – dry sanding with 1500-12000 grit pads. I wiped the stem down after each pad with Obsidian Oil. I finished the polishing with Before & After Stem Polishes – both Fine and Extra Fine. I wiped the stem down with a cloth impregnated with Obsidian Oil to protect and give the deep shine to the stem. I was happy to be finished with this beautiful House of Robertson Rusticated Diamond Shank Dublin. The vulcanite stem fit well and looked good with the rich finish of the rusticated bowl and shank. I lightly buffed the pipe with Blue Diamond on the buffing wheel and gave the bowl and shank multiple coats of Conservator’s Wax. I buffed it with a clean buffing wheel to raise the shine. I hand buffed it with a microfiber cloth to deepen the shine. The House of Robertson’s Dublin is a great looking pipe that has an amazing looking rustication. The dimensions of the pipe are Length: 5 ½ inches, Height: 2 inches, Outer Diameter of the bowl: 1 ½ inches, Diameter of the chamber: ¾ of and inch. The weight of the pipe is 42 grams/1.48 ounces. I will be packing it up to send back to my friend in Idaho along with the first pipe – the Radice Silk Cut Billiard. Thanks for reading the blog.

Replacing a tenon and restoring a Radice Silk Cut Billiard


Blog by Steve Laug

The next pipe on the table is a Radice Sandblast Billiard with a faux Bamboo shank. The briar has been carved to look like a piece of Bamboo but is actually briar. The pipe is stamped on the heel and reads Radice [over] Silk Cut and on the underside of the shank end it reads Hand [over] Made in Italy. It really is a beautiful pipe and the combination of “Bamboo” and the sandblast works really well the tapered acrylic stem. The fellow who sent it to me is a previous customer and in his box were two pipes with a snapped tenon – the Radice and a House of Robertson. This one was quite dirty with a thick cake in the bowl and overflowing onto the rim top. There was some burn damage on the inner edge of the rim at the back of the bowl and the pipe was dull and dusty. The tenon had snapped off cleanly at the shank end with no damage to the briar. The stem had tooth marks on both the top and underside ahead of the button and was also dirty. I took some photos of the pipe before I started my work on it. I took a close up photo of the rim top to show the condition of the bowl and inner edge. You can see the damage on the back inner edge of the rim. It will become more evident once the bowl has been reamed and cleaned. The photos of the stem show the tooth marks and chatter on both sides near the button.I took photos of the stamping on the heel of the bowl and the shank end to capture how it looked.I began my work on this pipe by pulling the broken tenon from the shank. I generally use a dry wall screw and twist it into the airway of the broken tenon and wiggle it free. This one came out quite easily. I went through my replacement tenons and found one that would work on this stem.I sanded the broken end of the tenon remaining on the stem with a sanding drum on my Dremel. I also sanded the diameter of the new tenon at the same time to get a good fit in the shank. I took photos of the tenon in the shank at this point to show the fit. I drilled out the airway on the stem with successively larger drill bits to accommodate the threaded end of the tenon. The last bit was ¼ inch which is perfect for the tenon. I slipped the stem over the tenon and took photos of the pipe at this point. It looks very good. With that done I turned my attention to the bowl. I reamed it with a PipNet reamer and took the cake back to briar. I cleaned up the remnants with a Savinelli Fitsall pipe knife. I sanded the bowl walls with a piece of dowel wrapped with 220 grit sandpaper. I cleaned up the rim top with a brass bristle wire brush to remove the lava in the sandblast and a bit of the burn damage on the back inner edge of the bowl.I cleaned out the internals on the stem and shank with pipe cleaners, cotton swabs and alcohol until they were clean.I rubbed down the bowl with Before & After Restoration Balm to clean, enliven and protect the briar. I worked it into the blast with a horsehair shoe brush. I let it sit and do its magic for 10 minutes and then buffed it off with a soft cloth. I set the bowl aside and turned my attention to the acrylic stem. I glued the tenon in the stem with Black Super Glue. While it cured I worked on the tooth marks in the stem.I cleaned up the tooth marks with alcohol and a cotton swab. I filled them in with black super glue and set it aside to cure.Once it had cured I flattened out the repairs with a small flat file. I sanded them with 220 grit sandpaper to further flatten them out and blend them into the surrounding area. I started polishing the stem with 400 grit wet dry sandpaper. I polished the acrylic stem with micromesh sanding pads – dry sanding with 1500-12000 grit pads. I wiped the stem down after each pad with a damp cloth. I finished the polishing with Before & After Stem Polishes – both Fine and Extra Fine. I wiped the stem down with a cloth impregnated with Obsidian Oil to protect and give the deep shine to the stem. I was happy to be finished with this beautiful Radice Silk Cut Billiard. The stem fit well and looked good with the rich finish of the sandblast bowl and faux bamboo shank. I buffed the pipe with Blue Diamond on the buffing wheel and gave the bowl and shank multiple coats of Conservator’s Wax. I buffed it with a clean buffing wheel to raise the shine. I hand buffed it with a microfiber cloth to deepen the shine. The Radice is a great looking pipe that ticks all of my boxes. The dimensions of the pipe are Length: 5 inches, Height: 2 inches, Outer Diameter of the bowl: 1 ½ inches, Diameter of the chamber: 7/8 of and inch. The weight of the pipe is 48 grams/1.69 ounces. I will be packing it up to send back to my friend in Idaho once I finish the second pipe he sent. Thanks for reading the blog.

Tenon and Stem Repair for an Interesting LL Bean Bent Billiard


Reading this restoration I was reminded of a few of the LL Bean pipes I have worked on. Nice job on the new tenon and removing the strange metal tubes! Well done.

This is the second heirloom pipe send to me for work, along with the Medico Square Pot about which I wrote last time. This time I’m working on an LL Bean Bent Billiard fitted with an interesting Smokemaster filter system first produced by Briarcraft in the USA in the early 210th Century, and again later by Grabow between the mid 1960s and 1990s. We’ll take a closer look at the system later, but for now let’s focus on the pipe itself.

As this first series of pics illustrates, the pipe arrived in two pieces, with the remains of the stem tenon lodged inside the pipe’s shank. The rim of the bowl was hidden under a crust of carbon “lava”, but not enough to disguise a fair amount of dents and dings around the outer rim edge. As the rest of the stummel was in good shape, these dents are most…

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The English Calabash That Wanted to Be a Charatan


Blog by Robert M. Boughton

https://www.facebook.com/roadrunnerpipes

Not even once in a blue moon does a pipe with an uncommon feature – but having no nomenclature other than the county where it was made – find its way into my hands.  The two most recent examples show MADE IN over LONDON ENGLAND on the right shank and did not meet their makers’ exacting standards.  The previous was a Ben Wade celebrating the poker shape with capacious panache, but other than replacing the stem with a smaller, lighter, inappropriate one, there was no way to counter the off-center of gravity and force the poker sitter to sit.  This time it’s a Charatan that looks more akin to a beanpot to me but was called a calabash by the maker.  Had not Steve seen my “beanpot” for what it is, I might have concluded that both pipes began their lives as Ben Wades.  Although Charatan pipes do not include MADE IN, I concluded that the two words were added when the pipe was rejected, maybe to differentiate the rejected from the approved.  Here are two models of Charatan’s Make calabashes from Worthpoint.Based on the seller’s detailed description of the smooth finish calabash, at the first link below, I believe Charatan made these pipes while Dunhill owned the brand (1978-1988). The grain of my pipe is not very good and required a few fills, but I don’t see why it could not have been modified to a sandblasted or relief finish as shown above. Here is mine as I received it. Sanding with 220- and 320-grit paper cleaned it up pretty well. Using 400-, 600- and 1000-grit paper, I was able to give it a first glow. After retorting the pipe, I turned my attention to the stem, which, other than being dirty, looked much better than most. I’ve started giving stems a bath in generic viscous stain remover. So far, I haven’t tried it on a specimen with oxidation, and I doubt it will do more than remove the grime that often goes with estate pipe stems. But I will report back on that.An hour later, I took the stem out of the goop, rinsed it and ran a pipe cleaner through.  Micro meshing it made two small teeth marks stand out.What I should have done was flick my Bic on the annoying little marks, but that didn’t come to me until after I reached the point of no return with another method that’s great on real divots.  Anyway, mixing Super Glue and vulcanite shavings from an old stem that’s perfect for the task was good practice.This method for removing bite marks makes a mess. Cleaning it up took a couple of days of sanding and buffing before the final shots after one more progression of 60-1000-grit sandpaper and all nine micro mesh pads – but the practice and results were worth it.Time to stain.At this point, I would have had only the final wheel buff left.  In fact, that’s what I did.  But the pic I took of the nomenclature revealed a hairline crack just below LONDON, ENGLAND.To mitigate the potential for the crack to spread, I used a touch of Super Glue and let it sit overnight. At least the foul spot was not all the way through the shank. A 120/180 sanding pad followed by a full micro meshing took off the excess dried glue.  I re-stained the effected area with Moccasin Brown and buffed the char off with 8000-12000 micro mesh. I decided to make the rim lighter with 8000-12000 micro mesh, also.Quick wheel buffing of the stem and stummel with Red Tripoli and carnauba on the buffer wheel completed the Charatan’s Make Calabash reject. The best part of this restoration is how close I came with my sweet reject to the stain of a third Charatan’s Make Perfection Calabash I found online.And I didn’t even know it until I copied and pasted the pic from Pipehub.com.  I look forward to finding a loving home for my poor disadvantaged friend here.

SOURCES
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/charatans-make-london-england-special-495600609
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/lane-era-charatans-make-relief-grain-412563595
http://www.pipephil.eu/logos/en/logo-charatan.html
http://www.pipephil.eu/logos/en/logo-benwade.html

Breathing New Life into the FIRST of a Cased Set of  Two English Made Peterson’s Bulldogs – 80S Bent Bulldog London Made


Blog by Steve Laug

The next pipe is the third of four Peterson’s and the first of a case set of Bulldogs that came to me from a friend of mine for me to work on. The pair (pipes 3 and 4) came in a nice leather cast that was travel/time worn on the top and underside and damaged on the edges. My friend sent me some photos of the case and the pipes that I am including here. It was not a large case but a common style carrying case for pipes of this era. I am hoping to do some work and narrow down the dates on the pair of pipes.The inside of the case was lined with soft golden suede. The case was fitted for the pipes that it contained – a straight and a bent bulldog with similar finishes. The lid of the case had a logo on it that was a gold and burgundy oval that read PETERSON’S over Dublin & London. It was dirty but not in bad condition. The finish on both pipes was dirty and tired looking but the grain peeked through the grime and oils on the finish. I decided to work on the top pipe first – the Bent Bulldog 80S. The rim top was had hash marks on the left side and had a thick lava build up. The inner edges of the rim looked like there was both burn damage and reaming damage. The outer edge looked good. The stamping on the shank sides was clear and readable. It is stamped on the left side and reads Peterson’s [over] London & Dublin [over] an oval with the word SPECIAL stamped inside. On the right side of the shank it is stamped London Made [over] England. There is no “P” logo on the stem. The stem is lightly oxidized and there is a large chip out of end of the P-lip that will need to be repaired if possible. I have included the pictures that my friend sent me before I took on the pipes. The first shows the rim top with the issues described above. The second and third photos show the stamping as noted above.It took nearly a month for the pipes to arrive in Canada for me to work on. I took photos of them to have an idea of what I was dealing with. You can see from the photos what I saw. The finish is was dirty but the pipe had some amazing grain on the shank and bowl sides. Rim top showed cuts or marks on left side and a thick lava build up. The inner edge of the bowl had some lava and it looked like a bit of damage from burn or reaming. The outer edge of the bowl was in surprising good shape. There was tobacco debris in the bowl and a thick cake. The original style stem is present and is oxidized and has the damage on the end of the button as noted above. You will see that damage clearly in the photos below. I took some photos of the rim top, bowl and stem to capture the condition of the pipe. You can see the cake in the bowl. There is a lava coat and some darkening. There was damage all around the inner edge of the bowl. You can see the hash marks/scratches on the rim top. The P-lip stem appears to be in good condition at first glance other than light oxidation. However a close look at the button will reveal the damage on the stem.I took some photos of the chipped stem to give a clearer sense of the damage to that area. Combined with the photos above you can see the extent of the damage. It was going to be slow, tedious work to rebuild that.I took photos of the stamping on the shank sides. They were clear and readable as noted above.I removed the stem from the bowl and took a photo of it to show its appearance. The saddle portion of the stem is slightly deeper than the newer 80S bulldogs that I have worked on. It is a nicely proportioned stem.Before I started the restoration process on the pipe I wanted to see if I could pin down a time period for the London Made England Special.

I turned to the section on that stamping in the book, The Peterson Pipe by Mark Irwin & Gary Malmberg. I quote from the section on the COM stamp on page 296-297 below:

Peterson maintained a factory in England for about a quarter of a century, from the late 1930s to ’62. Corporate transcripts and London business periodicals suggest that the London operation on White Lion Street was about to get underway in ’37. Only a handful of London hallmarked Petersons are documented, stamped with the date marks 1936 and 1939, and these have no COM stamp. Their output would be limited by the onset of the Battle of Britain in July 1940, but it seems reasonable to suppose pipes were made at the London factory during WWII, inasmuch as the K&P Staff Register lists twelve employees earning wages there in January ’44. London hallmarked Petersons have been identified with dates of 1949-54. Most London-made Petersons in a collector’s inventory were made in these postwar years, from 1949 until the closing of the factory in ’62… the presence of one variation of another on a pipe is not by itself a reliable indicator of its age.

That information narrowed the date of manufacture to the time period between 1949-1962. That is not a long period of time to be sure but now it was time to account for the stamping SPECIAL in an oval. What did that mean? Is there more specifics that can be learned with that stamp?

I turned to page 313 of the above Peterson Pipe book and read the following on the SPECIAL Stamp.

SPECIAL Stamp – used on special order or small batch custom pipes, it will often appear under other stamps, such as PETERSON’S SYSTEM, DE LUXE or DUBLIN & LONDON. Used frequently on pipes cut by master carver Paddy Larrigan.

So it appears that this set of Bulldogs were made in London in a limited time period and perhaps were made by Paddy Larrigan himself. Was he perhaps visiting the London factory in those post war years? I guess we will never know for sure but it kind of a nice thought regarding the pipes.

Armed with this information I started working on the pipe. I reamed the bowl with a PipNet pipe reamer to remove the cake from the bowl. I cleaned up the remaining cake with a Savinelli Fitsall Pipe Knife. I sanded the bowl with 220 grit sandpaper wrapped around a piece of dowel to smooth out the inside of the bowl. The walls looked very good with no checking or heat damage. I cleaned out the shank with pipe cleaners, cotton swabs and 99% alcohol to remove the oils from the walls. It was filthy and when I was finished it smelled clean and fresh. I cleaned out the inside of the stem with alcohol and pipe cleaners.I scrubbed the bowl with undiluted Murphy’s Oil Soap to clean off the thick oils and grime ground into the surface of the briar. I used a shank brush to clean out the mortise The bowl looked and smelled much better and the grain really began to stand out clearly. I worked over the top and the inner edge of the bowl with 220 grit sandpaper to smooth out the burned edge and the damaged rim top. It definitely came out looking much better. I try to steam out the dents a bit more to reduce them more. The trick on these old pipes is not to go overboard on the repairs but to leave a bit of the story behind as it changes the shape and feel of the pipe. I steamed out the dents/hatch marks on the top of the bowl using a hot butter knife and a wet cloth. I heated the knife on my gas stove and then pressed it against the wet cloth. The steam generated caused the dents to lift. I repeated the process until I was unable to lift them any more. While it is not perfect it is certainly better. I polished the briar (carefully avoiding the areas where the pipe is stamped on the shank sides) with micromesh sanding pads. I dry sanded it with 1500-12000 grit sanding pads. I wiped it down after each pad with a damp cloth to remove the sanding debris. I worked some Before & After Restoration Balm into the surface of the smooth briar with my finger tips. The product is amazing and works to clean, enliven and protect the briar. I let it sit on the briar for 10 or more minutes and then buff it off with a soft cloth. It really makes the grain sing. I set the bowl aside and turned my attention to the stem. This repair would be a series of new experimental processes that would require many in process adjustments. I am including the total process below. I decided to try something a little different in rebuilding the button end of the P-lip. I cut a chunk of vulcanite off a stem to start with and sawed it into smaller, flatter pieces. I shaved more vulcanite off of a donor stem to add to the mix. The process would take several steps. I flattened out the underside of the button with a file to provide a ledge to build on. I would do that portion first before rebuilding the rounded end of the stem. I greased a pipe cleaner with Vaseline and inserted it pointing upward to be able to rebuild the underside of the button. I coated the underside of the area with black CA glue and then some shavings of vulcanite. When that had cured to touch I mixed a batch of activated charcoal powder and black CA glue to make a putty. I set the stem aside to let the mix of vulcanite/charcoal powder and black CA glue harden. Once it had hardened I used a small file to flatten out the repair and recut the button edge. I started the initial shaping of the flattened underside. The next step will be to reshape the rounded end of the button making sure that the airway opens on the top side of the button as it was originally. I greased a pipe cleaner and inserted it in the airway and bent it upward to be able to rebuild the area around the opening. It is tricky to rebuild the button as the airway is on top of the button rather than in the end. I built up the area around the end of the button with Black rubberized CA glue. I wanted to flatten it as much as possible so that I could connect a piece of another P-lip stem.Once the repaired area had hardened I used a topping board to flatten out the end. I cut off the end of another P-lip with a hacksaw. I cut through the middle of the exit of the airway on the top of the stem as that would match what is left of the damaged stem end.I drilled two small holes in the end of the cut off button and the stem. The holes would allow the CA glue to go deep in the holes and add to bind the cut off tip to the end of the stem.I coated the ends of the piece and the stem with clear super glue and worked it into the drilled holes. I pressed the pieces together while aligning the airway in the stem and in the piece of button. I set it aside to let the repair cure. I filled in the joint spots with black super glue and again let it cure. It would take several layers of black super glue to build it up and make it even. I let it cure between each layer of the repair and flattened it with sandpaper and a file between the layers. I did the small touch ups on the air bubbles and edges with clear super glue and set it aside to cure. The stem was starting to look much better.I reshaped the  stem end carefully so as not to damage the stem further. I used a folded piece of 220 grit sandpaper to smooth out the joint of the repair. I filled in the spots in the repair that came up in the shaping process with clear super glue. I let them cure and smoothed out the repair with 220 grit sandpaper. Once I was done with the shaping the button looked very good. I polished the vulcanite stem with 1500-12000 micromesh sanding pads. I wiped down the stem with Obsidian Oil after each sanding pad. I have an oil impregnated piece of cloth that I use after each pad. I polished it further with Before & After Stem Polish both Fine and Extra Fine polishes. I gave it a further coat of Obsidian Oil and set it aside to dry. I put the pipe back together – the bowl with its rebuilt stem. This smooth finished Peterson’s London & Dublin SPECIAL 80S Bent Bulldog is a real beauty with great grain around the bowl. The P-lip style black vulcanite stem with the rebuilt P-lip button works very well with the medium brown briar. This English made Bent Bulldog is a very collectible part of Peterson’s history. The grain on the bowl is quite beautiful and came alive with the buffing. I used Blue Diamond on the buffing wheel on the bowl and very carefully on the rebuilt stem. I gave both multiple coats of carnauba wax on the wheel then carefully buffed the pipe with a clean buffing pad to raise the shine. I hand buffed it with a microfibre cloth to deepen the shine. The English made Peterson’s SPECIAL 80S Bent Bulldog feels great in the hand. It is lightweight and beautiful. The dimensions of the pipe are Length: 5 ½ inches, Height: 1 ½ inches, Outer diameter of the bowl: 1 ¼ inches, Chamber diameter: ¾ of an inch. The weight of the pipe is 1.73 ounces/49 grams. This the last of the four pipes I have to work on from my friend’s collection and then I will send them all back to him. Thanks for walking through the restoration with me. Cheers.