Daily Archives: December 9, 2017

Repairing a Broken Tenon on a Birks Savinelli “Lollo”


Blog by Steve Laug

I received a call from a local pipeman who said he had broken the stem off of his favourite pocket pipe. He had been given my name by a local pipe shop. He stopped by and dropped off a small bag with the parts of his pipe in it. He had dropped the pipe down the stairs and it had bounced down to the bottom in two pieces. He was able to remove the broken tenon but the damage was done. The pipe was stamped Birks and next to that it was stamped “Lollo” over Savinelli over Italy. The pipe was actually in really good shape. The bowl was clean and the briar had some nice grain all around the sides, top and bottom. The rim was clean and there was a very light cake inside. The broken tenon had a stinger in the tenon that he wanted to preserve. The stem was oxidized and showed some tooth chatter on both sides near the button. I told him I would have a look at the pipe and decide whether to replace the tenon or the stem. He was fine either way as long as the pipe was the same when he picked it up. I put the parts of the pipe on my work table and took photos of the pipe before I started working on it. I went through my box of tenons and found one that was the proper size for the mortise. I use threaded replacement tenons on stems like this. I used a Dremel and sanding drum to smooth out the rough edges of the broken tenon left on the stem. I used a sharp knife to bevel the edge of the airway in the end of the stem. Beveling it keeps the drill bit centred when I drill out the airway for the threaded end of the tenon.I chucked a drill bit the same diameter as the threaded end of the replacement tenon.  The photo below shows the tenon on the end of the drill bit. I lined it up before drilling it so that the stem was straight and the airway would not be curved. I drilled the airway to the same depth as the threaded end of the tenon. Once the airway was straight I used tap to cut threads in the airway in the stem so that I could turn the new tenon in place. I put a drop of glue on the threads of the tenon and quickly turned it into the stem until it sat flush against the face of the stem. I pushed the stinger into the tenon end and aligned it so that the slot in it was facing the top of the stem. I checked the alignment on the new tenon and all was straight and ready.The oxidation on the stem really showed up under the bright light of the flash. I polished the vulcanite stem with micromesh sanding pads – wet sanding it with 1500-2400 grit pads and dry sanding it with 3200-4000 grit pads. I wiped the stem down with Obsidian Oil after each sanding pad. I buffed the stem with Blue Diamond on the buffing wheel. I brought it back to the table and sanded it with the final three 6000-12000 grit pads. After the final pad I gave it a final coat of oil and set it aside to dry. I put the stem back on the bowl and gently worked the pipe over on the buffing wheel using Blue Diamond to polish the bowl and shank. I used a gentle touch on the pipe when I was buffing to polish the bowl. I buffed the stem with a harder touch to raise the gloss on the rubber. I gave the bowl and stem multiple coats of carnauba wax. I buffed the pipe with a clean buffing pad to raise the shine. I hand buffed it with a microfiber cloth to deepen the shine. The finished pipe is shown in the photos below. It looks better than it did in the beginning. It is the first little Savinelli “Lollo” I have worked on. It is well made and a beautiful piece of briar. The dimensions of the pipe are: Length: 4 inches, Height: 1 1/2 inches, Diameter of the bowl: 1 1/4 inches, Diameter of the bowl: 3/4 inches. I will be calling the pipeman who dropped it off for repair. I think he will enjoy his pipe!

Wally Frank Pipe Pump Kit – Vintage Pipe Cleaning Kit, Wally Frank, NYC


Blog by Steve Laug

My brother Jeff is really good at finding tobacciana items that are intriguing and this is certainly one of them. He sent me a link to this item on eBay to see what I thought. Of course I was hooked and said let’s go for it. He contacted the seller and made an offer and today he informed me that we now own the item. The seller described the item and included the photos that follow in his ad. “Here we have a nice vintage Wally Frank pump pipe cleaner. Still in nice condition, though the box is in distressed condition.  Please check out the photos. The little cup that the dirty water goes into is missing but almost any kind of cup or the sink would work and there is no cleaner liquid in bottle. The empty bottle of pipe elixir and the cover of the box are cool in and of themselves.  Would be a nice one to add to your collection.  This kit was originally sold through Wally Frank Ltd’s mail order department or in either of its two New York City stores.”

The cover of the box shows an illustration of the pump with a pipe in place in the pump mechanism. It says that the pump kit cleans, sweetens and deodorizes the pipe. The box says Wally Frank Pipe Pump Kit is for real pipe hygiene. It puts the OK in Pipe SmOKing. Along with that description is the address for the Mail Order Department along with the stores in New York City. The box is a little frayed and worn around the edges and missing one end on the box top.The inside of the lid reads: DIRECTIONS For Real Pipe Hygiene. It gives the directions on how to use the Pipe Pump.

  1. Remove all tobacco from the bowl of the pipe.
  2. Place bowl of pipe directly over pump intake and using the thumb screw tighten down until bowl is firm and airtight.
  3. Pour enough cleaning fluid into glass container to cover the tip of the pipe stem.
  4. Placing stem of pipe in fluid, pump until you feel sure that the pipe is sufficiently cleansed. (If the fluid should become very dirty, repeat operations 3 and 4.)
  5. Then remove pipe from glass container and continue pumping air for a few second to dry out the bowl and stem of the pipe. THE PIPE NOW WILL BE SWEET AND ODORLESS ENABLING YOU TO ENJOY PIPE SMOKING AT ITS BEST.
  6. Pump can be adjusted by tightening or loosening the hexagon nut at the end of the plunger.

Reorder Wally Frank Pipe Elixir when present supply is exhausted from Wally Frank, Ltd., 150 Nassau St. New York 7, N.Y. 4oz. Bottle 49 cents Postpaid. Use only the Wally Frank Pipe Elixir for Best Results. Do Not Use Elixir on Meerschaum Pipes.The seller included pictures of the inside of the box. It included the pump unit and the Elixir bottle. It was missing the glass jar that the stem sat inHe also included pictures of the pump unit and also the empty bottle of pipe Elixir. The bottle reads: Wally Frank Pipe Elixir for cleaning and sweetening briar pipes. The only fluid that gives perfect results with the Wally Frank Pipe Pump. For use in briar pipes only. The address follows.I did a bit of hunting on Google and found pictures of another Pipe Pump Kit. It was complete so I had an idea of what the missing bottle looked like in my boxed set. I am looking forward to getting the Pipe Pump package from my brother so I can try it out. The concept looks like it would work. I am wondering if I could pump isopropyl alcohol through the stem, shank and bowl and clean it out. It almost seems like it could do a similar job to a retort. When I get it I will work over a few pipes with it and see what I can find out about it. Thanks for looking. When I find stuff like this I love sharing it with folks who might possibly be interested in it as well. Thanks for reading.

Cleaning up a Whitecross Real Cherrywood Bent Billiard


Blog by Steve Laug

On one of my brother’s visits to an antique shop near his home he picked up a batch of pipes. The owner of the shop through in this little one as a freebie. It is a Ropp like cherry wood pipe. It has the cherry bark on the bowl and the remnants of bark on the shank. The stem is lightly oxidized but otherwise is in decent shape. There were not any tooth marks or chatter on it. The shank is screwed into the bowl and the fit is tight and aligned. The rim top has some burn and peeling on it but otherwise it is clean. The inner and outer edge of the bowl is very clean. The pipe has been lightly smoked but there is no cake in the bowl. It is stamped on the smooth underside of the bowl as follows: Whitecross over Real Cherry over Made in France. Jeff figured it was not worth cleaning up but there is something about these folksy Cherry wood pipes that intrigues me and I am a sucker for them. I took these photos before I worked on the pipe. The next photo shows the stamping on the underside of the pipe. The Made in France stamping makes me fairly certain that this is a Ropp brand pipe. It has all the components of a Ropp and the cherry wood look of the pipe is all Ropp.I unscrewed the shank from the bowl to clean up the interior of the shank and open area under the air hole in the bottom of the bowl. I cleaned it with alcohol, pipe cleaners and cotton swabs. I was surprised at how little dirt, tar and oil had built up there. I cleaned the airway in the shank and stem with pipe cleaners and alcohol.I cleaned up the rim top and edges with micromesh sanding pads. I wet sanded it with 1500-2400 grit micromesh pad and dry sanded it with 3200-12000 grit pads. I was able to remove all of the lava on the rim edge and the peeling edges of varnish. When I was finished the bowl looked really good. I rubbed the Cherry wood down with Before & After Restoration Balm. I used my fingers to rub it into the bark and the bare parts of the pipe. I wiped it down with a soft cloth and hand buffed it with a shoe brush. I rubbed the shank down with the Balm and buffed it with the shoe brush as well. I put the shank on the pipe and buffed it again with the shoe brush. I polished out the vulcanite stem with micromesh sanding pads – wet sanding it with 1500-2400 grit pads and dry sanding it with 3200-4000 grit pads. I wiped the stem down with Obsidian Oil after each sanding pad. I buffed the stem with Blue Diamond on the buffing wheel. I brought it back to the table and sanded it with the final three 6000-12000 grit pads. After the final pad I gave it a final coat of oil and set it aside to dry. I put the stem back on the bowl and gently worked the pipe over on the buffing wheel using Blue Diamond to polish the bowl and shank. I used a gentle touch on the pipe when I was buffing it so that the bark would remain intact on the bowl and shank. I buffed the stem with a harder touch to raise the gloss on the rubber. I gave the bowl multiple coats of Conservator’s Wax and gave the stem multiple coats of carnauba wax. I buffed the pipe with a shoe brush to raise the shine. I hand buffed it with a microfiber cloth to deepen the shine. The finished pipe is shown in the photos below. It looks better than it did in the beginning. It is a neat little Ropp style Cherrywood  pipe. The dimensions of the pipe are: Length: 5 1/2 inches, Height: 1 3/4 inches, Diameter of the bowl: 1 5/8 inches, Diameter of the bowl: 3/4 inches. I will be adding this one to the rebornpipes store shortly if you are interested in adding it to your collection. It will make a fine addition to the rack. If you are interested email me at slaug@uniserve.com or send me a message on Facebook. Thanks for looking.