Restoring a unique Peterson 10


I picked up this old Peterson shape number 10 at a flea market for about $12. This one needed cleaning inside and out as well as reaming. The finish was quite good. I just used a soft bristle tooth brush to get into the crevices. The shank had a crack in it so I banded it with a silver band. The bowl was caked and very narrow. I used a battery terminal brush and an old adjustable reamer to get inside of it. The stem on it was obviously not the original but a smaller diameter replacement stem that did not fit well. The shank had been sanded smooth but was not tapered to meet the misfit stem but it was perfect for setting the band. Before doing that I used some super glue to squeeze the crack in the shank together. I held it until it was dry. I then heated the band with my heat gun and pressure fit it on the shank. I flattened the bottom edge of the band to match the flat bottom where the stamping is. I fit and shaped a new stem. Once it was fit I bent it to a comfortable fit for the mouth. Then I sanded and polished it with my usual regimen of micromesh pads from 1500-6000 grit.

6 thoughts on “Restoring a unique Peterson 10

  1. upshallfan

    That is certainly a unique Peterson shape, very interesting and great job! When you heat the band with your gun, how difficult is it to get it on the stem quickly and without burning your hands?

    Reply
    1. rebornpipes Post author

      Al, I place the band on the shank as much as it will go before I heat it. It usually is not much actually but the briar is a good handle to hold while heating the band. I turn it quickly in my hand so that all sides are heated equally. I keep the heat away from the briar as much as possible. Once it is heated, I have a board with a thick piece of carpet (tight weave) on top of it and I push down on the pipe to slip the band on the shank. If it is still too tight I reheat until it goes on with a bit of pressure. Once it is on I dip it in running water to cool it.

      Reply
      1. upshallfan

        Interesting, thanks that makes sense. I haven’t needed to complete any band work to this point, but I guess it is inevitable.

        Reply
        1. rebornpipes Post author

          Al, it is inevitable at some point. There are option though. You can also use a piece of Delrin or stainless tubing and glue it inside the shank to repair the crack from the inside. Bryan did a great job on this one but very different in that he wanted the Pete band on top of his repair. That is what I found interesting. He did not choose the inside or the outside band he chose a middle way. Unique repair.

          One thing you can also do is get sterling bands and unique bands from places like Pipe Makers Emporium. Others make their own bands or have them made by a silver smith. The method I use does not change the diameter of the shank as I do not remove briar I instead heat and pressure fit the band. I find it less intrusive to the integrity of the shank. But that is just my preference.

          Reply
  2. Desertpipe

    This has to be one of the nicest old Petes I have seen in quite some time, and I do not recall this shape in any recent groups of Petes I have seen lately. Do you have any idea of the timeframe this model was made? Would you consider it a Featherweight?
    Nice save Steve.
    ChucK

    Reply
    1. rebornpipes Post author

      Thanks Chuck. When I found it at the flea market I had no idea it was a Peterson pipe. It looked Danish to me, maybe a Stanwell shape. So you can imagine the surprise when I turned it over and read the stamping on it. I have no idea of the age of it. It may be a featherweight as it is very light in weight. I will fire an email to some of the Peterson afficianados and see what they think.
      Steve

      Reply

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