Good “bones” make for a beautiful restored pipe – Scandia 792 Squashed Tomato


Blog by Steve Laug

The next pipe I took out of the latest box was a Scandia 792 – a shape I call a squashed tomato. It may be a Danish author shape. It was in decent shape – the stem was lightly oxidized and there were tooth marks and chatter on the top and bottom sides of the stem near the button. The finish was worn but functional, there was a lot of dust and grime in the grooves of the sandblast. The rim had some small chips out of the inner edge. There was also darkening on the top of the bowl. The next photos show the pipe when my brother received it.scan1The next two close up photos show the close up photos of the rim. The chips on the top of the rim and on the inner edge are visible. There was also some tarry buildup on the inner edge and on the top. scan4The next two photos show the stamping on the smooth portion on the bottom of the shank. It is stamped SCANDIA over Made in Denmark and the shape number 792. The second photo shows the SC logo on the shank. Scandia is a Stanwell second line.scan2The next two photos show the tooth chatter and tooth marks on the top and underside of the stem. There was also some slight oxidation. scan3My brother scrubbed the exterior of the pipe with Murphy’s Oil Soap and rinsed it with running water. He reamed the bowl and cleaned out the mortise and airway in the shank with cotton swabs, pipe cleaners and alcohol. When I received it the pipe was in very clean shape. The next pictures show what the pipe looked like when I brought it to the work table.scan6 scan7I took some close up photos of the rim to show the darkening and the wear on the inner and outer edge. There are some chips. I took close up photos of the stem to show the condition and oxidation on the stem.scan8 scan9I sanded it with 220 grit sandpaper to remove all of the tooth chatter and tooth marks. I also sanded it to remove the oxidation.scan10I used the Before & After pipe stem cleaning kit to work on the stem. I scrubbed the stem with the Pipe Stem Deoxidizer and a paper towel until I had removed the surface oxidation. I continued to scrub it until some of the deeper oxidation came out. I polished it the Pipe Stem Fine and Extra Fine polish to further remove the oxidation.scan11 scan12I used a folded piece of 220 grit sandpaper to sand the rim edges and the top. I was able to remove the chips and divots from the inner edge. The second photo shows the rim after sanding.scan13I used Rub ‘n Buff European Gold to highlight the stamping on stem to bring life back into the logo.scan14I wet sanded the stem with 1500-2400 grit micromesh sanding pads and wiped it down with Obsidian Oil. I dry sanded it with 3200-12000 grit pads and rubbed down Obsidian Oil after each set of three pads. After the final rub down of Obsidian Oil I set the stem aside to dry.scan15 scan16 scan17I waxed the bowl with Conservator’s Wax and buffed the pipe with a clean buffing pad. The next four photos show the polished bowl.scan18 scan19I sanded out the bowl with 220 grit sandpaper on around my finger to clean up the scratches and nicks in the bowl interior. I buffed the bowl with a clean buffing pad and gave the stem several coats carnauba. I buffed the stem with a clean buffing pad and then once again with microfibre cloth to raise and deepen the shine. The finished pipe is shown in the photos below. It will one day be on the rebornpipes store, if you would like to add it to your rack email me at slaug@uniserve.com or send me a message on Facebook or a comment on the blog. Thanks for looking.scan20 scan21 scan22 scan23 scan24 scan25 scan26 scan27

 

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