Savory’s Agryll Shape 189 Restoration


By Al Jones

This pipe belongs to my buddy Dave, who has a knack for picking up unusually great pipes. This one is a Savory’s Agryll, shape 189. Surprisingly, I found out very little about the Savory’s brand. Pipepedia doesn’t have a section on this maker and only states that the brand was created in 1885 by H.L. Savory & Co.; London and Oxford. At some unknown point, it was acquired by Dunhill. Via pipe forums, the consensus is that the Savory’s was a quality step below Parker and Hardcastle. This example, to my eye has some fantastic details and I’d say it is on par with my 1961 Dunhill Shape 120 which it greatly resembles, although on a slightly larger scale. The bowl on this one is 2 1/4″ deep and it is over 6″ in length. I don’t believe there is any way to determine the age of the pipe, there are no number stamps like Dunhill uses.

Below is a Savory’s Catalog page showing the Shape 189. This shape number was also used by Parker.

savorys_catalog_shapes

The pipe as received was dirty with some heavy oxidation on the stem, but it was relatively bite-mark free.

savorys_argyll_before-1

savorys_argyll_before-2

savorys_argyll_before-3

savorys_argyll_before-4

savorys_argyll_before-5

I reamed the slight cake from the pipe and soaked it with sea salt and alcohol. The stem was soaked in a mild Oxy-Clean solution. Following the soak, I cleaned the briar with some warm, mild soapy water. The briar was buffed by hand with Halycon II wax.

I mounted the stem and removed the heavy layer of oxidation with 400, then 800 grade wet paper, being careful to stay away from the stamped “S” logo. Next up was 1,000 and 2,000 grade paper, followed by 8,000 micromesh. The stem was then buffed with White Diamond and then Meguiars plastic polish.

The stem polished up brilliantly and the overall quality, button, tenon & fitment seems equal to my Dunhill pipes.

Below is the finished pipe.

savorys_argyll_finish-1

savorys_argyll_finish-3

savorys_argyll_finish-2

savorys_argyll_finish-4

savorys_argyll_finish-5

savorys_argyll_finish-7

savorys_argyll_finish-6

savorys_argyll_finish-8

savorys_argyll_finish-10

7 thoughts on “Savory’s Agryll Shape 189 Restoration

  1. tmydosh

    Great post as always! I recently restored a Savory’s Argyll 45 bent sandblast. Info on Savory’s is pretty scant. Do you know the date of the catalog page in this post? I have not been able to find a Savory’s catalog online so far, this is the first! Thanks!

    Reply
  2. Tom Mydosh

    I recently restored a Savory’s Argyll 45 bent billiard sandblast which closely resembles this shape 189. However, the mouthpiece has a stylized letter ‘S’ which resembles a G-clef. It has a standard mortise-tenon with no stinger. Do you have any idea of the date of the Savory’s catalog page? I have not been able to find a copy of a Savory’s catalog anywhere. Thanks!

    Reply
      1. tmydosh

        Thanks Steve. Your blog got me into restoring pipes, which has allowed me to build a nice rotation on a budget. And I liked your chapter in The Peterson Pipe, well done! Speaking of Peterson, I use Mothers Mag and Aluminum Polish on the nickle ferrules. It is available in a 10oz jar at automotive parts stores. It seems non abrasive and leaves a great finish. I have been impressed with Paragon and Halcyon II waxes so far. I do all restoration by hand. I wish fewer people owned buffers (present company excepted), so pipes could keep their nomenclature legible down through the years!

        Reply
    1. upshallfan Post author

      I’m not sure where I found that catalog page, but it was undated. Dating 2nd line pipes of any make is always challenging, and they are almost impossible to date.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.