Tag Archives: Al Jones articles

Comoys Supreme Grain Bent Billiard Restoration


By Al Jones

This is the 2nd Comoys that I restored this weekend.  And, the first “Supreme Grain” that I’ve ever seen.  I found a few examples on the web.  The pipe was in very solid condition.  Unfortunately, I also lost the before pictures of this pipe and only have the sellers.  As you can see, it is aptly named, and better grain than some Blue Ribands that I’ve seen.

The pipe had very light oxidation and a few dings and bruises in the briar.  The shape 42 is the larger of the two Comoy’s bent billiards.

I initially thought it had a drilled C and started restoration the restoration with my usual regiment, which involves sanding right over the very durable logo.  I was horrified on closer examination to find out that the logo was not drilled.  However, it is seemingly quite deep and almost looks like an insert of sorts.  I’ve done a lot of Comoys pipes from every era, but not yet encountered one quite like this one.

I removed the very light oxidation with 800, 1,500 and 2,000 grit wet paper, this was followed by 8,000 and 12,000 micromesh. The stem was then buffed with White Diamond and Meguiars Plastic Polish.

The bowl was reamed and soaked with alcohol and sea salt.  I used an electric iron on high with a wet cloth to steam out most of the dings around the bowl.  The bowl was then buffed with White Diamond and several coats of Carnuba wax.

Below is the finished pipe.

Comoys 184 Golden Grain Restoration


By Al Jones

This looked like an easy restoration, but once in hand, it presented a few challenges.  I somehow deleted the “before” pictures, so I can’t share them.  This sellers picture shows that it was in pretty decent shape.  The shape 184 is listed as a Bent Apple on the Comoys shape chart and catalogs.

There was a white piece of the drilled, C stem logo and the button had what appeared to be a very poorly done hole repair.

The briar only needed to be reamed and soaked.  There were a few dents that I steamed out with an electric iron and cloth.

For the C logo fix, I entered a local beauty shop for the first time in my life and they recommended a white gel nail polish.  I applied the polish,let it sit overnight, than sanded smooth with 800 grit paper, it worked quite well and to the naked eye, is invisible.

I removed the very light oxidation with 800, 1,500 and 2,000  grit wet paper, this was followed by 8,000 and 12,000 micromesh.  This removed the poor repair job to a tiny pin hole underneath the bottom. I used the black superglue and accelerator to make that repair.  I cut a small v-shaped piece from an old credit card, coated that in grease and inserted it into the button to keep glue from sealing the draft hole.  Once the glue set, the plastic card is removed.

The stem was buffed with White Diamond and Meguiars Plastic Polish.

The briar was buffed lightly with White Diamond and several coats of Carnuba wax.

Below is the finished pipe.

The Guildhall Shape 256 Restoration


By Al Jones

The Comoy’s Author shape, the 256 is one of my favorites and quite rare.  I’ve never been able to find this shape in any Comoy’s catalog, perhaps that contributes to it’s rarity. Three years ago, I was fortunate to find an Old Bruyere finish 256, and detailed that restoration here:

https://rebornpipes.com/2017/05/13/finally-comoys-old-bruyere-256-restoration/

This pipe, is a Comoy’s second-line “The Guildhall”, instantly recognizable by the metal strats stem logo, which always captivates me.   The pipe arrived, with a one surprise, there were some deep circular marks in the briar, right around the shank.  I can’t imagine what created those marks, but I knew it was going to be a challenge to remove or minimize them.    Otherwise, it looked like a straightforward restoration.  There was minimal build-up on the bowl top and the stem was in very good condition.  Below is the pipe as it was received.

I used a piece of worn 2,000 grit wet paper to remove the build-up on the bowl top.  The bowl was then reamed and treated to an alcohol and sea salt soak.  While the bowl was soaking, I soaked the stem in a mild solution of Oxy-Clean.  Following the bowl soak, I cleaned the shank with a bristle brush dipped in alcohol and worked in some twisted paper towel, until it came out clean.

The stem was mounted and I used a lighter to lift the slight dents around the button.  The slight oxidation was removed with 800, 1,500 and 2,000 grit wet paper, followed by 8,000 and 12,000 micromesh sheets.  The stem was then buffed with White Diamond and Meguiars Plastic Polish.

I then turned my attention to the briar and marks.  I used a wet cloth and an electric iron set on high to steam out some of the deep marks on the bowl.  I had some success, lifting nearly all on the bottom of the bowl but some remain on the other areas.    The bowl was then buffed with White Diamond and several coats of Carnuba wax.

Below is the finished pipe.