Comoy’s Heritage 120 Restored (1977)


By Al Jones

I’ve seen a few “Heritage” pipes go thru Ebay in the past few years, but I wasn’t able to locate anything about the line. The ones I’ve seen are packaged with an upgraded presentation box and red silk sleeve. I believe they may have also come with a matching tamper. This one has an 18k Gold, Hallmarked band with the date letter “C”. I learned that gold hallmark dates are the same as silver. The C means it was made in 1977. The C logo on the pipe is also the 3 part type, which was used until around 1981. The pipe had some scorching and nicks on the bowl top, the gold band was dented but the stem was nearly mint.

Here is the pipe as it was received.

Comoys_Heritage_102_Before (1)

Comoys_Heritage_102_Before (2)

Comoys_Heritage_102_Before (3)

Comoys_Heritage_102_Before (4)

Comoys_Heritage_102_Before (5)

I’ve never previously worked on a Gold band. This band was loose and slipped right off. Fortunately, there is a custom jeweler on the PipesMagazine forum. He runs a jewelry business in Alabama called “Cosmic Folklore”. I contacted him for advice on how to make the band more presentable. He volunteered to work the band himself, as I found (and assumed) that the gold layer was quite thin and fragile. I received the pipe and band back after a week. It was much improved and I was relieved of the worry of ruining the band. Thanks Cosmic!

I glued the band back in place with a few drops of wood glue, which seemed to work fine. The bowl was reamed of the slight cake and soaked in alcohol and sea salt. Once the soak was completed, I used a series of bristle brushes dipped in alcohol to clean the interior of the shank.

The rim had some problems that needed to be addressed and I wanted to alter the bowl top and shape as little as possible. I used some Oxy-Clean solution on a rag to rub off the tar build-up. The rim was darkened underneath. I used some 2000 grit wet paper to carefully remove as much of the rim darkening as possible. I was also able to work out some but not all the dings around the bowl top. I used some lightened Fieblings Medium Brown stain to revive the color. The bowl was then polished with White Diamond rouge and several coats of Carnuba wax.

The stem took little effort. I removed some of the light oxidation with 1500 and 2000 grade sandpaper. Next was the 8000 and 12000 grade micromesh.

Below is the finished pipe. If you have any information about this Comoy’s series, please let me know.

Update: I did receive some information from a member of the Pipes Magazine forum. He has a 1975 Comoy’s catalog which describes the Heritage pipe, detailed below. I had assumed that the 120 stamp was a shape number, but now I believe that to be the serial number.

Heritage: Once in a while we come across a bowl so beautiful that we hate to part with it, almost preferring to lock it away for our own private pleasure. But when we do release these beauties, we give them a 22 ct.gold mount, a hand cut mouthpiece and a casket to match. Deservedly rare and consequently expensive. Each pipe carries it`s own serial number.

That forum member was nice enough to scan and email me that referenced catalog page.

Heritage_Line_Catalog_Info

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (1)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (4)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (2)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (5)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (6)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (7)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (8)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (3)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (9)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (12)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (13)

Comoys_Heritage_120_Finish (11)

3 thoughts on “Comoy’s Heritage 120 Restored (1977)

  1. rebornpipes

    Al, great work and good call on the gold band. the history of this one is really helpful. I had no idea that is what the Heritage line was all about. Well done.

    Reply
  2. Aaron

    Looks great, Al… nice work! I would not have thought to employ a jeweler to restore the band but it makes a lot of sense at second thought. Beautiful pipe… the grain is stunning.

    Reply

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