Sasieni Ashford S Ruff Root Restoration


By Al Jones

I have several models of the Sasieni Ashford in various finishes, but this is my first S model, which designates the saddle stem. The Ashford shape is number 88 on the Sasieni shape chart. The “Four Dot” stamping indicates that the pipe was made between 1946 and 1979. Sasieni called their sandblast finish the “Ruff Root”. My other Ruff Root Ashford has a tan stain and of course the tapered stem.

The pipe was in decent condition, with a heavily oxidized stem and a few teeth indentions. There was a mild cake in the bowl, but the briar appeared to be in very good shape with strong nomenclature.

The pipe as received is below. The stem dots were a beautiful shade of Robins-egg blue.

Sasieni_Ashford_S_Ruff-Root_Before (1)

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Sasieni_Ashford_S_Ruff-Root_Before (5)

I reamed the bowl and soaked it with sea salt and alcohol. At the same time, I put a dab of grease on the four blue stem dots and soaked it in a mild Oxy-clean solution.

I’ve found Sasieni stems to be very resilient in removing teeth indentions and this one responded nicely to some heat. All of the indentions save one underneath were able to be removed. I removed the oxidation from the stem starting with 800 grit paper, than 1500 and 2000 grades. 8000 and 12000 grades of Micromesh were used next. The stem was then buffed with White Diamond and Meguiars Plastic Polish.

The briar only needed to be buffed by hand with Halycon wax.

The finished pipe is below and I’ve included a picture comparing it to the standard Ashford Ruff Root.

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Sasieni_Ashford_S_Ruff-Root_Finish (5)

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3 thoughts on “Sasieni Ashford S Ruff Root Restoration

  1. Adrian

    Hi, when sanding oxidation off stems, do you always rub in the same direction and if so do you go along the length of the stem or around it? Finally, for stems with dots and logos, how do you deal with these when sanding. Someone told me not to sand a logo but there if there is clear oxidation in the logo, how do you deal with this?

    Thanks in advance.

    Reply
    1. upshallfan Post author

      That is a great question. Sanding oxidation requires moving with the stem (longways) and also around the circumference. Working at the button has to be across and around a round shank connection is circular. I do like finishing with moving along the stem longways to finish each grade of paper (up to the button). I think that leaves less sanding marks to removed or hidden with the buffer. “Polishing” in any medium entails removing any surface imperfections, and results in the “shine” (metal,car paint, pipe stems, etc.) Fewer marks mean a greater shine. This is why I finish with the higher grades of micromesh, the 8000 and 12000 grades yield scratches that are not visible to the naked eye.

      Reply

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