Daily Archives: February 19, 2016

Comoy’s Shape 43 Tradition Restoration


Blog entry by Al Jones

I can’t resist pre-Cadogan, Comoys Tradition grade pipes. They are readily available and decent examples needing restoration don’t sell for exorbitant prices. This Shape 43, Large Bent Billiard was well loved, but showed promise. I’ve worked on a few Shape 42 Medium Bent Billiards, but this is the first Shape 43 that I’ve encountered. Curiously, this shape is not on any of the on-line Comoy’s shape charts (pipepages, etc.). It is on the shape number list on the Pipepedia site.

The stem was heavily oxidized, but the drilled, 3 piece “C” logo was readily identifiable. The stem had some teeth marks on both sides of the stem and some small sections of button were worn. Tars in the shank kept the stem from being inserted all the way. The bowl had a heavy layer of tar on top.

“Before” Pictures

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I used some 800 grit wet paper to carefuly remove the thickest coating of tars from the bowl top. Then, 1000 grit and finally a wet cloth with oxy-clean water. The tars came off completely and showed no scorched briar. The Comoys trade-mark beveled bowl top was worn but intact. There was one dent in the bowl top and one small crease on the front of the bowl. Using an iron set on “High” and a wet cloth, I was able to steam most of the bowl top dent out and raise the crease as well.

The bowl was soaked with isopropyl alcohol and sea salt. After the soak, I used a series of bristle brushes and alcohol to clean the interior of the shank.

The stem was soaked for several hours in a mild Oxy-Clean solution. I use a lighter to lift out the dents on the top and bottom of the stem. There was one tooth prick that was repaired with Black Superglue. I used the Black Superglue to rebuild the worn sections of the button. I blended the button in using 800 grit paper. The oxidation was removed starting with 800 grit paper, then 1500 and 1000 grades. This was followed with 8000 and 12000 grade micromesh. The stem was then buffed with White Diamond rouge and auto plastic polish. I’m very pleased with the condition of the stem.

The bowl was buffed lightly with White Diamond and several coats of Carnuba Wax. The excellent nomenclature was buffed by hand.

Below is the finished pipe.

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The Peterson Flat Bottom Shapes: A Visual History


Great information that I wanted to pass on to rebornpipes readers.

peterson pipe notes

St. Patricks L Tank 2016“Come in and take a load off.”
– American colloquialism, c. 1940

One of the great attractions to pipe-smoking, however unconscious it may sometimes be, lies in the sense of finally getting to sit down and take a load off your feet after a hard day’s work.

I’ve been an enthusiast of pokers, cherrywoods and other sitting shapes almost since I took up pipe-smoking some forty years ago. I suspect part of the satisfaction has to do with this anticipation that it’s time, as that old Desert Father Abba John the Dwarf used to say, to take the string off the bow, put away your tools and relax. There’s something calming about a pipe that can do the same –  just sit down and take care of itself, isn’t there?

Peterson has had two names for such pipes: “setter” in the 1906 catalog, and “flat bottom,” coined by master-carver Paddy…

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