Tag Archives: Eric Boehm

Why I smoke a pipe – Eric Boehm


Blog by Eric Boehm

Here is another of Eric’s pieces – this one is a great essay on why he smokes a pipe. I love the ideas that he has collected in this essay and his straightforward answer to those who question his pipe smoking. Thanks Eric for letting me post this here.

I routinely use this missive as a broad sheet to answer the question of “Why I smoke a pipe”. A question so often asked by many of my anti-tobacco friends. Friends, I might add, that give me a hard time whenever I light up my tobacco pipe. You see, I’m a reader, and my heroes are those I read about. And usually they involve men who smoked a pipe.

Run your eyes down the list below of names and see how many you recognize. Collectively, I would argue, these men actually made the 20th Century, both literally and figuratively. To a man, all avid pipe smokers, each and every one. Moreover, many lived well beyond the average lifespan of their day, many passing in their mid to late-eighties.

Albert Einstein, Mark Twain, William Faulkner, John Steinbeck, Norman Rockwell, Orson Wells, JRR Tolkein, CS Lewis, Douglas MacArthur, Admiral Arleigh Burke, Stanley Baldwin, Neville Chamberlain, Bing Crosby, President Gerald Ford, Carl Sandburg, Harold Macmillan, Konrad Lorenz, Errol Flynn, Edgar Rice Burroughs, John D. MacDonald, Warner Baxter, Thomas Selfridge, Charles Nelson Reilly, Ossip Zadkine, Max Frisch, Paul Casals, Jack Lynch, Patrick Moore, Anthony Hulme, Ronald Colman, Alexander Kent, Jacques Brel, Lino Ventura, Alfred Wainwright, Rudolph Bultmann, Philippe Sollers, Jean Gabin, Leo Malet, G.E. Moore, Gilbert Ryle, Edmund Husserl, J.L. Austin, Lalo Schifrin, James Whitmore, Anthony Quayle, Ralph Richardson, Bernard Grebanier, Jean-Paul Sartre, Stanley Holloway, Carl Jung, Paul Kruger, Curd Jurgens, Gerard Walschap, Trevor Howard, Tony Benn, Rod Hull, Trevor Baylis, Joss Ackland, Frank Muir, Manny Shinwell, Jack Hargreaves, Warren Mitchell, Rupert Davies, Russ Abbot, Van Gordon Sauter, Walter Cronkite, Robert Fulghum, Milorad Pavić, Glenn Ford, Erwin Shrodinger, Moustapha Akkad, Evelyn Waugh, Harold Wilson, Bertrand Russell, Alf Landon, Edgar Buchanan, Dean Jagger, Edward G. Robinson, Rudyard Kipling, Aaron Spelling, P.G. Wodehouse, Allen Dulles, Otto Klemperer, Henry Fonda, Lee Van Cleef, Jack Lemmon, Peter Cushing, Barry Fitzgerald, Hume Cronyn, Graham Chapman, Nigel Bruce, Bennet Cerf, Raymond Chandler, Alexander Graham Bell, Arthur Frank, Richard E. Byrd, Gregory Peck, Albert King, Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, Edward Abbey, Juan Trippe, Frank Sinatra, General George S. Patton, Jacques Derrida, Hurbert Hoover, Sid James, Fred Trueman, Vincent Schiavelli, Eric Morecambe, Stephen Fry, Fred Thompson, Roscoe Dickinson, Guy N. Smith, Gunter Grass, Sean O’Casey, A.A. Milne, Sir Compton Mackenzie, Laurie Lee, W. Somerset Maugham, J.B. Priestly, Andre Dubus, Gordon Parks, F.A. Mitchell-Hedges, W.W. Denslow, William Conrad, William Gillette, Edwin Hubble, Rober Oppenheimer, Niels Bohr, Robert Young, Clark Gable, Fred MacMurray, Ralph Bellamy, Cary Grant, David Ogilvy, Sir Winston Churchill, King George VI, Arthur Miller, Ernest Hemingway, John Ford, Shelby Foote, Herschel Burke Gilbert, Thomas Johnston Taylor, Theodor Geisel (Dr. Seuss), Sir John Mills, Owen Barfield, Alan Christopher “Al” Deere, Elliot Harold Paul, Healey Willan, Harold Tucker Webster.

After perusing such a list, I ask: Can it be that the greatest minds of the 20th Century were all common miscreants, who did not fully fathom “what they were doing to themselves”? Are we, with all our advances of modern science, more intelligent than they were? How many men today can you count that can measure to the list above? I am hard pressed to find a handful, if that.

We current tobacco pipe smokers actually represent the historical legacy of a community of world pipe smokers, a community which, in the not too distant past, encompassed some 35% of the adult males in the United States. Lest it not be forgotten, these anonymous pipe smokers were our grandfathers, and allowed for the freedoms many of us enjoy today. Although far fewer in number today, we nevertheless still hold the candle to the memory of these men and the deeds they accomplished, with, of course, a pipe in hand.
__________________
Thanks everyone for your positive comments. Whenever I catch flack from anti-tobacco folks, friends, wife & children included especially those do-gooder “soccer moms” driving minivans, who quickly shield their children’s eyes when they see me – I go to length to point out just exactly who historically smoked a pipe. If Albert Einstein saw the sense to smoke a pipe, just to name one – or Shelby Foote, one of my favorites – then who in blue blazes are they to question my choice to smoke a pipe in public? (I started this thread after coming home from a 4th of July picnic, where it was clearly intoned to me that pipe smoking was not allowed in a NJ public park! On account of the kids).

Everyone says they miss the America depicted by Norman Rockwell, or reminisces fondly on the “greatest generation” who fought against fascism in the Second World War. Well, nearly all those joes smoked a pipe! And I don’t mean hidden away in their man caves, but out on the street, holding their kid’s hand, or carrying groceries home. That’s why I like reading Marc Munroe Dion so much. Smoking a pipe in public puts the brakes on society’s mindless, head-strong rush into an uncertain future. In short, it puts the mute button on our infotainment world. Which is something I like. Thanks for letting me rant. I’ll get off the soap box now.
______________________________________
If I’m ever in London, I think I’ll go to the Speaker’s Corner – that point where Oxford Street and Hyde Park meet, in the shadows of Marble Arch – and carry on an oral tradition that is becoming somewhat lost to a modern culture of email and online chat rooms. For over 150 years, Speaker’s Corner has been one of London’s most eccentric attractions. Soapbox central! There, with a large clenched Dunhill group 6 billiard, containing smouldering Pirate Kake, and reeking of 70% Latakia – my chest festooned with a large placard bearing the likeness of Alfred Dunhill – there I shall read out the proclamation entitled “Why I smoke a pipe”. Should be able to get through the first several paragraphs before the Bobbies cart me away in a white coat!
____________________________________
Parting thoughts –
My comments were: “Wow! I am dumbfounded. Personally I don’t give a hoot how pipe smokers are perceived by the wider society. I smoke a pipe throughout the day because I am a pipe smoker. Period. I smoke in private and I smoke in public. I also smoke in the can. If someone has a problem with it, they can contact my lawyer. Really, I could care less what others think of me and my pipe. Life is short enough as it is to worry about what the neighbors think. Get a life. Smoke a pipe. And let’s try not to think too deeply about it. Eh?”

Newbie tips (web links for the uninitiated) – Eric Boehm


Blog by Eric Boehm

Eric originally posted this compendium of information on Smokers Forums. I found it to be a helpful collation of information for both the beginning and the long time pipe smoker. His recommendations and the collection of web links is a great beginning point. Each of those who use it can add your own additions and adjustments as you use the material but Eric has done a great service to pipemen everywhere with this information. I wrote to him and asked his permission to post it on rebornpipes. He graciously consented. I have edited it to make the introduction broader than that of its original format. The material is just too valuable to be lost. Thanks Eric for your work on this. To all the readers of rebornpipes – enjoy the wealth of information.

…The old adage, “And though it is much to be a nobleman, it is more to be a gentleman” (– Anthony Trollope) pretty well sums up the experience of becoming a pipeman. It wasn’t so long ago, that wisdom was imparted in the old Brick & Mortar tobacco shop, where one could spend the afternoon, leaning on the counter, sampling tobaccos, learning about pipes, and shooting the breeze with the old timers – gentlemen all. Generations grew up that way. Unfortunately, those days are long gone – chalk it up to “progress”, the faster pace of life, skyrocketing costs, stagnant paychecks – in short, all leading to more work for less gain. Pipe smoking is my way of regaining a balance in a troubled world.

When I first started to smoke a pipe in the late 1980s, I remember being a bit overwhelmed by the number of choices. The primary question was – what to smoke? Although everyone classifies their pipe tobaccos differently, I can see about 15 different categories: (1) Straight (non-flake) Virginias; (2) Virginia Flakes (Light); (3) Virginia Flakes (Full); (4) Virginia /Kentucky Blends; (5) Virginia / Burley Blends; (6) Burley Blends; (7) Virginia / Perique Blends; (8) Virginia / Oriental Blends; (9) Light / Medium Latakia Mixtures; (10) Medium / Full Latakia Mixtures; (11) Lakeland Style (Unscented); (12) Lakeland Style (Scented); (13) Ropes and Plugs; (14) Cigar Leaf Blends; and (15) Aromatics. This classification is my riff on the one provided by the Pipe Club of Norfolk (UK). Within each category, of course, there exists a multitude of individual blend choices. Thus, as a newbie you will never want for a wide variety of choices – in fact, many pipemen pursue the perfect smoke as the pursuit of their “Holy Grail”.

I was also overwhelmed, in my beginnings, by the multitude of pipe materials to choose from (e.g., briar, corn cob, cherrywood, morta [bog wood], olive, maple, clays, meerschaum, metal, etc.) and the multitude of pipe styles to choose from (e.g., quarter bents, half bents, full bents, straights, etc.), not to mention the incredible array of pipe shapes (e.g., acorn, pear, apple, author, bent apple, bent ball, bent billiard, bent brandy, bent bulldog, bent Dublin, bent egg, bent pot, billiard, blowfish, brandy, bulldog, calabash, Canadian, cavalier, chimney, churchwarden, cutty, Dublin, freehand, hawkbill, horn, Liverpool, Lovat, lumberman, Oom Paul, panel, poker, pot, prince, Rhodesian, skater, tomato, volcano, Zulu). Then there were the terms associated with the architecture of the pipe itself (e.g., lip, bit, stem, tenon, stem face, shank face, shank, stummel, bowl, mortise, draft, plenum, heel, foot, rim, chamber, etc.). And lest we forget the types of stem choices (e.g., saddle, tapered, military/army style, screw type, combination type, etc.) and bit style (e.g., standard, wide comfort, fishtail, P-lip, regular and double bore, denture bit, and double comfort bit, to name but a few). A good place to begin to appreciate these terms might be Pipedia, a “wiki for pipes”.

Sitting in my garage in the early 1980s with a clenched Dr. Grabow pipe, full of Captain Black White, I was also trying to learn the basic technique of smoking a pipe – primarily how to avoid tongue bite and palate scorching. I mean if it’s not comfortable, why the hell spend time at it? I finally managed to learn how to develop the slow rhythmic cadence of imbibing tobacco in a pipe, that, when done right, can lead to a significant satisfactory state of mind. There definitely is a “zone” or “Zen state of mind” – call it relaxation if you will – that is reached when smoking a pipe, especially with quality tobacco. I believe it’s this actual mental state that draws me back to the pipe, time and again, rather than to any chemical addiction to the nicotine itself. I would even go so far as to state that, historically, it was the gift of tobacco pipe smoking that was bequeathed to the European by the New World Amerindian, who saw pipe smoking as a religious or sacramental exercise.

What might appear to be a steep learning curve for the beginner has, I am sure, led to the gradual demise of pipe smoking in our culture, in favor of the dreaded cigarette – a fatal transition that occurred throughout the 1950s and 60s. Combined with the physical disappearance of the small mom and pop tobacco shop, where the tradition of pipe smoking was orally passed down “father to son”, so to speak, it spelled the end of the wide-spread pipe smoking culture.

As I grew up in the 1960s, I distinctly remember many pipe smokers in the streets and shops, but by the end of the decade, an entire generation gave up the pipe for the cigarette. Chalk it down to advertising, or the faster pace of life. I know that deep, repeated inhalation of tobacco will most definitely kill you. I have seen it in family members first hand. Perhaps it is this that has driven the anti-tobacco movement to mistakenly group all tobacco products as dangerous. Of historical interest to the new pipe smoker, it would be worthwhile to visit the various sites listing the biographies of famous pipe smokers, many of whom lived well into their late 80s. I think I speak for many of us when I say that pipe smoking has progressed far beyond a mere hobby, and, in fact, has become a way of life. A deeply satisfying way of life, I might add.

Why did I decide to write this article? I found that as I was welcoming new members to an online pipe smokers forum, I began to think what I would be seeking in an on-line community of pipe smokers, if I were new to the game. Due to accumulated wealth of information available in the archives on most pipe forums, a real wealth of data related to the pipe and cigar smoking community may at times seem a bit overwhelming to the newbie. I realized that what I would be seeking initially would be a single thread that could serve as an introduction to the pipe smoking craft. The thread would contain a list of hyperlinks that related to: (1) Forum options, (2) Blogs, (3) e-Magazines, (4) Societies and Clubs (5) Tobacco reviews, (6) Retailer Listings, (7) Retailers (8) Less expensive pipes, (9) Estate Pipes, (10) More expensive pipes, (11) Pipe repair sites, (12) Pipe cleaning / maintenance sites, (13) Pipe smoking technique links, (14) Pipe books, (15) Famous pipe smokers, (16) Introductions to pipe tobaccos and, finally, (17) a series of my favorite pipe related quotes.

Essentially, this is what I have prepared here: A single package of links that would enable the newbie to at least get a firm footing in the craft of pipe smoking. With a firm basis of links, the newbie would then be off to a running start and have access to the wealth of information available of the internet. It should be remembered that these are merely recommendations, and do not constitute all the links that are out there. As such, the links are meant to be jumping off points for those of you who are new to pipe smoking – nothing more, nothing less. (I would also like to take this opportunity to ask my fellow pipe travelers if there are sites not listed that you think should be, please, by all means, let me know, and I would be more than happy to oblige you). In the end, as a new pipe smoker, you will eventually find what works for you, through trial and error. Hopefully, these links will minimize the latter. Of course, you’ve already done the best thing by joining up with this forum. My goal throughout is simply to try to retain the newbie so that our pipe smoking community can continue to grow. The more the merrier. So, here goes…

(1)Forums:
http://www.smokersforums.co.uk/forums.php
http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/
http://pipechat.info/index.php?PHPSE…1nb194t81e6v3&
http://forum.pipes.org/discus/discus.cgi
http://www.puff.com/forums/vb/general-pipe-forum/
http://www.pipemakersforum.com/
http://thepipesmoker.wordpress.com/
http://www.pipesmokerscubby.com/forum.php

(2)Pipe Blogs:
http://glpease.com/BriarAndLeaf/
http://www.apassionforpipes.com/
http://www.qualitybriar.com/blog/
http://pipedia.org/index.php?title=Main_Page
http://www.smokingpipes.com/blog/index.cfm
http://olefattguy.blogspot.com/
http://briarfiles.blogspot.com/
http://smokingpipetobacco.com/
http://pipesmagazine.com/blog/category/kevins-blog/
http://pipesmagazine.com/blog/catego…-of-the-ashes/
http://talbertpipes.blogspot.com/
http://www.brothersofbriar.com/
http://blog.enriquepipes.com/
http://www.pipemakersforum.com/
http://www.loringpage.com/
http://meanderingsmoke.blogspot.com/ (Meandering Smoke)
http://www.pipesmokerunleashed.com/ Pipe Smoker Unleashed

(3)Pipe eMagazines:
http://pipesmagazine.com/ (Pipesmagazine.com)
http://www.pt-magazine.com/ (Pipes & Tobacco Magazine)
http://www.pipesmokemag.com/ (Pipe Smoke Magazine)

(4)Societies & Clubs:
http://naspc.org/ (North American Society of Pipe Collectors)
http://www.corpipesmokers.org/ (Conclave of Richmond Pipe Smokers)
http://www.seattlepipeclub.org/ (Seattle Pipe Club)
http://www.pipeshowonline.com/ (Pipe Show On-line)

(5)Tobacco Reviews:
http://www.tobaccoreviews.com/
http://luxurytobaccoreviews.com/
http://pipes.priss.org/
http://smokingpipetobacco.com/
http://pipesmagazine.com/blog/catego…bacco-reviews/
http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze43wza/pipes.html

(6)Retailer listings:
http://pipesmagazine.com/pipe-store-locator/
http://www.pt-magazine.com/home.php?id=40
http://www.rtda.org/links.html

(7)Retailers:
http://www.smokingpipes.com/ (Smokingpipes)
http://www.cupojoes.com/ (CupOJoes)
http://www.iwanries.com/home.cfm (IwanRies)
http://www.uptowns.com/index.php (Uptowns)
http://www.pipesandcigars.com/ (Pipes & Cigars)
http://cornellanddiehl.com/ (Cornell & Diehl Tobacco)
http://www.4noggins.com/ (4 Noggins)
http://www.mac-baren.com/TopMenu/Main-2.aspx (Mac Baren Tobacco)
http://villigerstokkebye.com/ (VilligerStokkebye Tobacco)
http://www.pipetobacco.com/Merchant2…AFFIL=6E0Bo1ga
http://www.paylesspipes.com/ (Payless Pipes)
http://www.pipesandcigars.com/ (Pipes & Cigars)
http://www.lewispipe.com/ (Lewis Pipe & Tobacco)
http://www.thebriary.com/ (The Briary)
http://www.alpascia.com/pipes/ (Al Pascia)
http://www.mkelaw-pipes.com/ (Mkelaw Pipes)
http://www.libertytobacco.com/ (Liberty Tobacco)
http://www.pipemakers.org/ (Pipe Makers Emporium)
http://www.cigarandtabacltd.com/ (Cigar &Tabac, Ltd.)
http://www.faderstobac.com/ (Fader’s)
https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-B…34344463248233 (The Briar & the Burley) http://www.kramerstobaccoshop.com/fr…eframeset.html (Kramer’s Pipe & Tobacco Shop) http://www.greentreetobacco.net/home.html (Greentree Tobacco Co. Inc.)
http://www.obsidianpipe.com/ (Haunted Mists New Obsidian Oil anti-oxidation curative) http://www.parklanetobacconist.com/ (Park Lane Tobacconist)
http://tobaccoshop.com/tobacco.html (Tobacco Shop of Ridgewood NJ)
http://www.pipestud.com/ (Pipestud – rare tobacco tins)
http://www.justforhim.com/catalog/ (JustForHimTobbacconist)
http://www.marscigars.com/ (Mike Rutt’s Mars Cigars & Pipes)
http://fujipub.com/briarpatchcigar/ (Briar Patch & Cigar)
http://www.alleghenysmokeworks.com/ (Allegheny Smoke Works)
http://www.abnersworld.com/ (Abners’ World)
http://www.tobacco-barn.com/t-so-pipesandtobacco.aspx (Tobacco Barn)
http://www.ljperetti.com/ (L.J. Peretti)
http://www.outwesttobacco.com/ (Out West Tobacco)
http://www.rdfield.com/ (R. D. Field LLC)
http://www.thebriary.com/ (The Briary)
http://www.thebriarpipe.com/ (The Briar Pipe)
http://www.tinderbox.com/index.fx? ca…6406&cid=&csm= (The Tinder Box) http://www.chiefcatoonah.com/index.html (Chief Catoonah Tobacconist)
http://www.smokershaven.com/about-us.aspx (Smokers Haven)
http://www.pipeshop.com/ (Pipeshop.com)
http://www.milantobacco.com/ (Milan Tobacco)
http://mccranies.com/store/ (McCranie’s Pipe & Tobacco)
http://www.natsherman.com/ (Nat Sherman)
http://gatlinburlier.com/ (The Gatlinburlier Tobacconist)
http://www.smfrankcoinc.com/ (S.M. Frank & Co.)
http://www.boswellpipes.com/ (Boswell Pipes)
http://www.briarblues.com/ (Briar Blues)
http://www.brighampipes.com/2006%20Update.htm (Brigham Pipes)
http://www.pipeandpouch.com/avcopi.html (Pipes & Pouch)
http://www.pipes2smoke.com/ (Maxim Engel)
http://www.meerschaumstore.com/categories.asp (Meerschaum Pipes)
http://www.milantobacco.com/pipes.htm (Milan Tobacco)
http://www.aab-taxfreepipes.com/defa…=false&lang=uk (Bisgaard Pipes)
http://www.neatpipes.com/store/comersus_index.asp (Neat Pipes)
http://www.finepipes.com/ (Fine Pipes International)
http://www.lenuvolepipes.com/ (Le Nuvole Pipes)
http://www.pulversbriar.com/ (Marty Pulvers)
http://piapipes.com/default.asp?lang=uk1 (Pia Pipes)
http://www.jamesislandpiper.com/ (The James Island Piper)

(8)Less Expensive Pipes:
http://www.corncobpipe.com/ (Missouri Meerschaum corn cob pipes USA)
http://www.charlespipes.com/charlespipecollectibles (Stanwell Pipes)
http://www.peterson.ie/pipes/pipes.html (Peterson Pipes Dublin)
http://www.drgrabow.net/ (Dr. Grabow Pipes USA)
http://www.smfrankcoinc.com/kaywoodie/index.htm (Kaywoodie Pipes)
http://www.smfrankcoinc.com/ybmd/index.htm (Medico &Yello-Bole Pipes)
http://www.boswellpipes.com/index.html (Boswell Pipes USA)
http://www.premierpipes.com/Falconpi…lconpipes1.htm (Falcon Pipes)

(9)Estate Pipe Listings:
http://www.estatetobaccopipes.com/search (Ticker tape estate pipe listings)
http://exilesplace.dk (Exile’s Pipes)
EBay favorite sellers: This’ll get you started on the estate listings…
ashtonpipes1
coopersark
pipestud
thesecondhandsmoker
great-estate-pipes
bruyerepipestinashobby
pipegirl1380
beeshquatrolife
jatane
treasurepipes

(10)More Expensive Pipes:
http://www.qualitybriar.com/ (Quality Briar)
http://www.twofriendspipes.com/(Two Friends Pipes)
http://www.oldnelliepipes.com/ (Old Nellie Pipes)
http://ssl.cybersun.com/4Dscripts/we…enterstore?ams (Mark Tinsky Pipes)
http://www.downiepipes.com/home.html (Stephen Downie Pipes)
http://www.remingtonpipes.com/ (Adam Remington Pipes)
http://www.baweaverpipes.com/ (Bruce Weaver Pipes)
http://www.ashton-taylor.com/ (Ashton-Taylor Pipes)
http://www.annejulie.com/pipes.html (Anne Julie Pipes)
http://www.chhedapipes.com/ (Chheda Pipes)
http://www.bonaquisti.com/ (Bonaquisti Pipes)
http://www.cornelius-maenz.de/ (Cornelius Maenz Pipes)
http://www.pohlmannpipes.com/ (Brad Pohlmann Pipes)
http://jwh.fastmail.fm/ (Jack Howell Pipes)
http://www.smokingpipes.com/pipes/ne…dson/index.cfm (Adam Davidson)
http://www.willpurdy.com/index.htm (Will Purdy Pipes)
http://www.parkspipes.com/ (Michael Parks Pipes)
http://www.shurewoodbriarpipes.com/Welcome%21.html (Colin Rigsby Pipes)
http://www.beckerpipes.com/ (Paolo Becker Pipes)
http://www.perrywhitepipes.com/ (Perry White Pipes)
http://www.florovpipes.com/ (Alex Florov Pipes)
http://www.pipendoge.de/mehret_infoengl.htm (Tom Richard Pipes)
http://www.hedingpipes.com/ (Peter Heding Pipes)
http://www.heeschen-pipes.dk/default.asp (Peter Heeschen Pipes)
http://www.matzhold-peter.at/ (Peter Matzhold Pipes)
http://www.ailarov.com/ (Sergey Ailarov Pipes)
http://www.smpipes.com/ (Steve Morrisette Pipes)
http://www.tatupipe.com/english.html (Tatsou Tajima Pipes)
http://www.pipendoge.de/mehret_infoengl.htm (Tom Richard Mehret Pipes)
http://www.jalanpipes.com/ (J. Alan Pipes)
http://www.lobnik.com/ (Gregor Lobnik Pipes)
http://www.ming-kahuna.com/ (Ming Kahuna Pipe Accessories)
http://www.pipemoretti.com/ (Moretti Pipes)
http://perrywhitepipes.com/ (Perry White Pipes)
http://www.vollmer-nilsson.com/ (Vollmer & Nilsson Pipes)
http://www.willpurdy.com/index.htm (Will Purdy Pipes)
http://www.wolfgang-becker-pfeifen.de/ (Wolfgang Becker)
http://www.crosbypipes.com/ (John Crosby Pipes)
http://www.moritz-pipes.com/Bitmap/A…8/album_01.htm (Jurgen Moritz Pipes)
http://www.kentpipes.com/ (Kent Rasmussen Pipes)
http://www.shekitapipes.com/ (Konstantin Shekita Pipes)
http://www.ballebypipes.com/gallery/index.html (Kurt Balleby Pipes)
http://www.larryssonpipes.com/ (Larrysson Pipes)
http://www.maigursknetspipes.com/smo…71present.html (Maigurs Knets Pipes)
http://www.pipendoge.de/Revyagin_infoengl.htm (Michail Revyagin Pipes)
http://www.von-erck.com/ (Lee Von Erck Pipes)
http://raddavispipes.com/ (Rad Davis Pipes)
http://emarklepipes.com/ (Ernie Markle Pipes)
http://claessenpipes.com/ (Dirk Claessen Pipes)
http://www.andersenpipes.dk/ (Søren Eric Andersen Pipes)
http://www.formerpipes.com/former.html (Former Pipes)
http://www.p-i-p-e.com/ (Andrew Marks Pipes)
http://www.kevinarthurpipes.com/ (Kevin Arthur Pipes)
http://www.davidjonespipes.com/index.php? page=about (David Jones Pipes)
http://www.drbobpipes.com/pipes.html (Dr. Bob Pipes)
http://www.pipestudio.com/ (Elliot Nachwalter Pipes)
http://www.lunapipes.com/ (Luna Pipes)
http://www.rmperkins.com/ (RM Perkins Pipes)
http://www.enriquepipes.com/fr/accueil.htm (David Enrique Pipes)
http://www.danishpipemakers.com/makerindex.html (Danish Pipemaker List)

(11)Pipe Repairs:
http://www.nightowlpipeworks.com/home/ (Night Owl Pipe Works)
http://www.precisionpiperepair.com/ (Precision Pipe Repair)
http://www.walkerbriarworks.com/ (Walker Briar Works)
http://www.jhlowe.com/tobacco_pipe_repairs.htmhttp://www.norwoodspiperepair.com/ (Norwood’s Pipe Repair)
http://www.lewispipe.com/repair.htm (Lewis Pipe Repair)
http://www.jmarini.com/ (J Marini Pipe Repair)
http://www.americansmokingpiperepairs.com/ (American Smoking Pipe Repairs)

(12)Pipe cleaning & Maintenance:

http://pipedia.org/index.php?title=Pipe_care/cleaning

(13)Pipe smoking techniques:
http://pipedia.org/index.php?title=P…ing_techniques

(14)Books on pipes:
http://www.briarbooks.com/

(15)Famous Pipe Smokers:
http://josephcrusejohnson.blogspot.com/http://homepage.mac.com/ericmelby/Pi…us/famous.html http://www.fumeursdepipe.net/personnalites13.htm

(16)Introductions to Pipe tobaccos:
http://pipedia.org/index.php?title=Pipe_Tobaccoshttp://www.glpease.com/http://www.pipeclubofnorfolk.co.uk/touchstones.php

(17)Favorite pipe quotes:
“The fact is, Squire, the moment a man takes to a pipe, he becomes a philosopher. It’s the poor man’s friend; it calms the mind, soothes the temper, and makes a man patient under difficulties. It has made more good men, good husbands, kind masters, indulgent fathers, than any other blessed thing on this universal earth.” – Sam Slick, The Clockmaker

“I believe that pipe smoking contributes to a somewhat calm and objective judgment in all human affairs.” – Albert Einstein

“As an example to others, and not that I care for moderation myself, it has always been my rule never to smoke when asleep, and never to refrain from smoking when awake.” – Mark Twain

“A pipe is a tool by which we use our breath to turn leaves into ashes.” – Marty Pulvers

“A cigarette is to be smoked. A cigar is to be enjoyed. A pipe is to be savored.” – Groucho Marx

“A woman is an occasional pleasure but a cigar is always a smoke”. – Groucho Marx

“Nowhere in the world will such a brotherly feeling of confidence be experienced as amongst those who sit together smoking their pipes.” – The Results and Merits of Tobacco, 1844, Doctor Barnstein

“The value of tobacco is best understood when it is the last you possess and there is no chance of getting more.” – Bismarck.

“Pipe smoking is the most protracted of all forms of tobacco consumption. It may explain why pipe smokers are generally regarded as patient men and philosophers.” – Jerome E. Brooks, from The Mighty Leaf, Tobacco Through the Centuries

“Well, it keeps my hands busy, and my mouth shut.” – Exile

“…So it shall be for all time. If discord has broken out between two beings, let them smoke together. United by this bond, they will live in peace and friendship thereafter.” – Attributed to the Great Manitu, the Great Spirit.

“A pipe is the fountain of contemplation, the source of pleasure, the companion of the wise; and the man who smokes, thinks like a philosopher and acts like a Samaritan.” – Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton

“The pipe draws wisdom from the lips of the philosopher, and shuts up the mouth of the foolish; it generates a style of conversation, contemplative, thoughtful, benevolent, and unaffected.” – William Makepeace Thackeray, from The Social Pipe

“It smelled like cherry or chocolate or chestnuts roasting on an open fire. Or leaves burning in the back yard in those long-ago autumns when you were still allowed to burn leaves in the back yard. In those days, pipe smoke was a man’s signature scent. It was the incense in the Church of Dad, a burnt offering to the god of domesticated masculinity, a symbol of benevolent paternalism. A passing whiff of your father’s or grandfather’s brand — Erinmore Flake, say, or Royal Yacht Mixture — can summon vivid memories even decades after his death. Smell is a key that unlocks the vault of memory, and the rich aroma of pipe smoke conjures up a lost world of armchairs and ashtrays, humidors and dark-wood racks holding pipes with WASPy names like Dunhill and Ferndown and Hardcastle. It was a world of wise, contemplative men who sat and smoked and read serious, leather-bound literature, as well as a world of rugged outdoorsmen, canoeists and fly fishermen and clipper ship captains who puffed their pipes as they pored over nautical charts before sailing ’round the Horn. It was a magical world, part reality and part myth, and now it has all but disappeared, fading like smoke.” – Peter Carlson (Washington Post Staff Writer), Sunday, June 19, 2005, title: “Bowled Over No Longer”. (I’d like to add that our presence on this site refutes that pipe smoking “…now has all but disappeared, fading like smoke”).

My Tobacco Classification / Touchstone Blends – by Eric Boehm


I remember when Eric originally posted this piece on Smokers Forums and I appreciated the work he did on it. I find it a helpful way of explaining tobaccos to newcomers and to refresh my own understanding of the tobaccos that I enjoy. I wrote and asked him if I could reproduce the article for the rebornpipes blog and he graciously consented. Here is Eric’s article on Tobacco Classification.

There are as many ways to classify pipe tobacco blends as there are pipe smokers, and then some. However, I have found the following list suits me. I see tobacco blends for the pipe smoker divided into 16 categories. An alternative, earlier, classification was provided by the Pipe Club of Norfolk UK, from which some of the categories originated. However, since this early list, a number of new categories have arisen, such as the Cigar Leaf Blends. Also, a number of pipe smokers have advocated against the terms “English Blends” and “Balkan Blends”, as many tobacco blends actually span the two and there really exists a continuum of sorts. So the terms “English Blends” and “Balkan Blends” have been dropped by many, in favor of the more descriptive terms “Latakia Mixtures”, which in turn is divided into “Light / Medium” and “Medium / Full”.

I am aware that this is a highly subjective exercise. And it is to be expected that everyone will have a different take on what constitutes a Touchstone Blend. Also, there will be “lumpers” and “splitters” – that is, those who feel there are too many categories and those who feel the need to split even more. What I hoped to do here, for myself really, was to set up a series of benchmark blends that I could later use as “standards” by which to judge future blends within a category. It is hoped that these lists will provide a jumping off point to begin exploring the wonderful world of pipe tobaccos for others as well.

1. Straight Virginias (non-flake, -rope etc.).
2. Virginia Flakes (Light).
3. Virginia Flakes (Full).
4. Virginia Plugs.
5. Virginia Ropes and Twists.
6. Lakeland Style.
7. Virginia / Kentucky Blends.
8. Virginia / Burley Blends.
9. Burley Blends.
10. Virginia / Perique Blends.
11. Virginia / Perique / Burley Blends.
12. Virginia / Oriental Blends.
13. Light / Medium Latakia Mixtures.
14. Medium / Full Latakia Mixtures.
15. Cigar Leaf Blends.
16. Aromatics.

1. Straight Virginias – non-flake, non-plug, non-ropes & twists.
Bulk No. 5100 Red Cake. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “This blend is a style of English Virginia that has seldom been seen in the United States. A sweet, exceptionally soft, fully rubbed matured cake”. Fire Cured Virginia. Cut: Ready Rubbed. Bulk.

Old Belt Ready Rubbed. W.O. Larsen, DK. “A blend of mature Orange Virginia tobaccos from the Old Belt in Virginia and North Carolina. The blend is lighted pressed into tobacco cakes, which are stored for aging. After cutting, the tobacco is rubbed out to facilitate easy filling of the pipe and an even burn. The tobacco burns exceptionally well with a cool smoke and a well-balanced and supreme natural taste”. Air Cured Virginia. Cut: Ready Rubbed. 100g Tin.

Red Ribbon. McCranie’s, USA. “A beautifully aged Red Virginia like no other. Brimming with rich, mellow flavor as only nature can provide. A special allotment of prime 2000 crop North Carolina leaf has been secured for our discriminating pipe smokers. The softest, most enjoyable straight Virginia we’ve ever smoked. With a light vacuum seal, the tobacco will continue to mellow with age”. Air cured Virginia. 50g tin.

Virginia No. 1. Mac Baren, DK. “A ready rubbed tobacco, manufactured from a selection of choice, ripe Virginia tobaccos, which gives Virginia No.1 a mild, sweet smoke”. Air cured Virginia. Flavoring: Sweet / sugar. Cut: Ready rubbed. 50g pouch, 100g tin, bulk.

Old Gowrie. Charles Rattray, DE. “This blend is a Virginia (with a hint of Perique) tobacco, rubbed-out for a finer cut”. Blender: Kohlhase, Kopp und Co. KG. Air cured Virginia, Perique. Cut: Ready Rubbed. 50g tin, 4oz tin, bulk. Note: Placed here rather than as a Virginia /Perique Blend because of the minor component of Perique.

2. Virginia Flakes (Light) –
Bulk No. 2010 Classic Virginia. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “This is a blend of Eastern and Middle Belt lemon, orange, and orange-red Virginias. A sweet, smooth, and zesty smoke”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: Bulk.

Capstan Medium Navy Cut. Capstan, UK. “A medium to mild blend of carefully selected Virginia tobaccos with a natural aroma enhanced by a subtle flavour”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g Tin.

Hamborger Veermaster. Dan Tobacco, DE. “Classic sailor`s flake tobacco made from rich Golden Virginias, sweet and mild.. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g tin.
Matured Virginias, No. 24. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “An unusual form of Flake tobacco, its deep chestnut color results from the extended aging of full flavored Old and Middle Belt leaf very lightly seasoned with Drama. A smooth, robust tobacco good anytime for those who prefer the darker Virginia flavor. Is is especially well suited for outdoor smoking”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Oriental (Drama leaf). Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: 50g & 100g tin.

Hal O’ the Wynd. Charles Rattray, DE. Blender: Kohlhase, Kopp und Co. KG. “A pure Virginian tobacco of a most unusual share of strength. This is a strong, sharp aged red Virginia blend that will perk you up quickly”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: 50g & 100g tin. (Note: The homepage Kohlhase & Kopp says “Kentucky-Virginia-Perique”. Flake rubbed by hand). Note: Many consider this at the top end of the light Virginia Flake Blend, rather than as a full.
Fog City Selection: Union Square. G. L. Pease, USA. “A blended, sliced cake of high-grade flue cured leaf, from beautiful, sweet brights to deep, earthy reds, without the added sugars and flavorings common to many Virginia flakes. It’s rich on the palate, evolving in layers with the clean, natural sweetness of pure tobaccos. It offers a pleasant room note, and a delightful finish. For those seeking the pure Virginia experience, try Union Square”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 2oz & 8oz tins. Released in May, 2009. Note: Many consider this at the top end of the light Virginia Flake Blend, rather than as a full.

3. Virginia Flakes (Full) –
Full Virginia Flake. Samuel Gawith, UK. “Samuel Gawith Full Virginia Flake is for lovers of pure pressed Virginias. Created in the heart of Lakeland, the hot-pressed blended Virginias take on a delicious and distinctive dark colour that creates a pipe smokers dream, a feeling of calm, serenity and anticipation of the next pipeful. A “must have” for all Virginia lovers. Medium strength”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g tin.

Best Brown Flake. Samuel Gawith, UK. “A firm favourite for the pipe smoker looking for a medium strength, gentle and slow burning tobacco. Manufactured using hand-stripped flue cured Virginias with no flavours added, Best Brown will reward with a cool, sweet smoke with a delectable aroma and good sidestream. Mild to medium”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g tin.

Personal Reserve: Blackwoods Flake. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “The characteristic, natural sweetness of mellow, Red Virginias mingles inextricably with the richness and inherently spicy aroma of Black Stoved Virginias in this doubly aged red and black all-Virginia cake mixture. An artistic achievement in tobaccos for the pipe, this beautiful mottled flake is incomparable in smoothness, balance and refinement”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: 50g & 100g tin.

Personal Reserve: Dark Star. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “Years before tinning, this tobacco begins as bright yellow, sugary top grade Virginia and Carolina leaf. Through careful triple aging, pressing and stoving, it becomes rich, cool and dark. A seductively spicy aroma develops during the extended maturing process to complement the complex flavor of this concentrated, smooth broken flake, which is easily rubbed out to suit any occasion”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: 50g & 100g tin.

Marlin Flake. Charles Rattray, DE. Blender: Kohlhase, Kopp und Co. KG. A companion to Old Gowrie. A shade darker, greater strength, different aroma, but otherwise a tobacco in the same tradition”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g & 100g tin, Bulk.

4. Virginia Plugs –
Cut Virginia Plug. Fribourg & Treyer, DE. “ A full bodied, medium to full strength pressed flake. Very complex from start to finish with a well balanced taste that both boldly spicy and subtlety sweet”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g tin.

New World Collection: JackKnife Plug. G. L. Pease, USA. “JackKnife Plug – dark-fired Kentucky leaf and ripe red Virginia tobaccos, with their deep, earthy flavors, are layered on a central core of golden flue-cured for a hint of bright sweetness, then pressed and matured in cakes, and finally cut into 2oz blocks. Slice it thick and rub it out for a ribbon cut, thin for a shag, or chop it into cubes. The choice is yours”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Kentucky, Virginia. Cut: Plug. Packaging: 2oz tin. Introduced in January, 2011.

New World Collection: Triple Play. G. L. Pease, USA. “Ripe red and bright flue-cured tobaccos are joined by piquant Acadian Perique and a balanced measure of smoky dark-fired Kentucky. The leaf is pressed and matured in cakes before being cut into 2oz bars, resulting in a bold blend for Virginia and Perique fans”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Kentucky, Virginia, Perique. Cut: Plug. Packaging: 2oz bar. Introduced in May, 2011.

Peterson’s Perfect Plug. Peterson, IE. Blender: Kohlhase, Kopp & Co. “This excellent plug tobacco comprises selected Virginia leaf from Africa and Brazil blended with Burley leaf from Malawi. The tobaccos are lightly cased before drying and pressing and then are heated and stored for 2 weeks before cutting. The result is a full bodied yet fruity blend, sure to appeal to the experienced pipesmoker”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia. Cut: Plug. Packaging: 50g tin.

Kendal Plug. Samuel Gawith, UK. “Whoever knows Samuel Gawith knows their famous Kendal Plug. The tobacco has a naturally sweet smell, and when burning it produces a very pleasant aroma. The taste tends to be sweetish, particularly at the beginning, and then slowly the sweetness gives some way to a whole range of taste variations, all very pleasant. It burns so slowly and evenly. A very satisfying smoke”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Cut: Plug. Note: This may be better placed in the Lakeland category.

5. Virginia Ropes and Twists –
Black Irish Twist. Gawith, Hoggarth, & Co., UK. “All our twist tobacco varieties are manufactured by the same spinning process using dark fired wrapper leaves. The filler is again, predominantly dark fired leaf with the addition of a small percentage of dark air cured Indian leaf. They are therefore strong tobaccos. Black Twist, because the cooking process removes some of the stronger tar and nicotine elements, provides a milder smoke than the brown twist”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Rope. Packaging: Bulk.

Black XXX Rope. Samuel Gawith, UK. “This tobacco is not for the faint of heart. Strong and robust smoke”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Rope. Packaging: Bulk

Brown Rope No. 4. Samuel Gawith, UK. “Twisted forms of aged dark brown leaf. Enormous flavor aroma and strength tamed with slow puffing”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Cut: Rope. Packaging: 50 g tin or Bulk.

Sweet Rum Twist. Gawith, Hoggarth, & Co., UK. “This is a twist made from the same ingredients as the Black and Brown Irish X. It has additional Rum flavoring added during manufacture. Again, this is a very strong tobacco as it does not undergo the pressure cooking process”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia. Flavoring: Rum. Cut: Rope. Packaging: Bulk. Note: This could well be placed as a Lakeland.

6. Lakeland Style –
Best Brown Flake. Samuel Gawith, UK. “A firm favourite for the pipe smoker looking for a medium strength, gentle and slow burning tobacco. Manufactured using hand-stripped flue cured Virginias with no flavours added. Best Brown will reward with a cool, sweet smoke with a delectable aroma and good sidestream. Mild to medium”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g Tin.

Broken Scotch Cake. Gawith, Hoggarth, & Co., UK. ”A very mild blend, using predominantly flue-cured Virginia, but with the addition of some sun-cured both to cool and sweeten the smoke. A rough-cut into very coarse pieces also contributes to cooling the smoke”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Coarse Cut. Packaging: 50g tin & Bulk.

Dark Birdseye. Gawith, Hoggarth, & Co., UK. “Manufactured from Dark tobacco ‘whole leaf’ rather than strips, the mid-rib (or stem) gives the ‘birds eye’ effect when cut. A strong smoke which was particularly favored by the fishermen as the finer cut meant the tobacco was easier to light and to keep-in on board ship when the weather was bad”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: Bulk.

Ennerdale Flake. Gawith, Hoggarth & Co., UK. “Our best selling flake by a wide margin. Predominately virginia leaf from Brazil, Zimbabwe and Malawi (86%) but with the addition of sun cured Malawi (10%) to add sweetness, strength and to cool the smoke and Malawi Burley (4%) to “carry the flavour” in addition to its cooling and strength qualities. (Burley is very good at absorbing casings and flavours) A background flavour of Almond is enhanced with the addition of fruit flavours, vanilla, and the special ‘English type’ flavours which give this tobacco its distinctive, yet typical ‘English’ Aroma associated with the UK best selling brands such as Condor, St Bruno and mellow Virginia”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia. Flavoring: Fruit / Citrus, Almond, Vanilla. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g tin, Bulk.

Bob’s Chocolate Flake. Gawith, Hoggarth, & Co., UK. “The main characteristics of this flake come from the 8% Latakia included in the blend and the smooth chocolate aroma. Brazilian, Zimbabwe, Malawi virginia leaf make up 82% of the blend providing a mild/Medium smoke cooled with the addition of 8% Malawi sun cured and 2% Malawi Burley. The latakia cools but does also add strength and aroma. The cocoa casings and chocolate top flavours are rounded off with vanillas and other flavours providing sweet notes”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Latakia. Flavoring: Alcohol /Liquor, Cocoa / Chocolate, Vanilla. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50 tin & bulk.

Rum Flake. Gawith, Hoggarth, & Co., UK. “The ‘Christmas cake’ of all our tobaccos. A very rich, sweet fully flavoured blend. The main feature is the high proportion of naturally sweet sun-cured tobaccos in the blend – over 40% Only 30% Virginia leaf, with the rest of the blend coming from burleys and Dark-air cured contribute to a strong, but rewarding smoke. The whole blend is cased in maple sugars to further enhance the natural sweetness of the sun cured leaf and then rounded off with a dash of rum”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia. Flavoring: Rum, Maple. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: 50g tis & bulk.

7. Virginia / Kentucky Blends –

660: Silver Flake. Solani, DE. Blender: R.L. Will. “An incredible blend of premium dark red and sweet Virginias from the “border belt”, light yellow Virginia from South Carolina and dark-fired, spicy Kentucky. Slow burning and because no flavoring has been added, this blend has a real tobacco taste”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Kentucky, Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g & 100g tin.

Three Nuns Original. Bell’s. Blender: Orlik Tobacco Company A/S, DK. “A blend of dark fired and sun cured tobaccos mixed with the finest Brazilian Lights to produce the unique flavour and mellow smoking characteristics for which Three Nuns is famous”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Kentucky, Virginia. Cut: Curly Cut. Packaging: 50 or 100g tins. Note: In the original formula, from Imperial Tobacco, Three Nuns was a VA-PER mixture.

Original Mixtures: Cumberland. G. L. Pease, USA. “Robust and possessing a subdued sweetness, Cumberland is a delightfully orchestrated suite of American tobaccos, featuring a rare and exquisite mahogany Kentucky, aged in bales for twenty years. Red and matured Virginias establish a theme; the Kentucky and a pianissimo of Perique create the variations. Pure, natural tobacco flavors are harmonized by delicate arpeggios and underscored by deep, resonant tones. The coda is lovely and lingering – a perfect finish to a rich performance. Best savored slowly”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Kentucky, Virginia, Perique. Cut: Coarse Cut. Packaging: 2oz & 8oz tin. Introduced in April, 2002. Note: An unusual blend that is not really a touchstone for this category.

8. Virginia / Burley Blends –
Golden Sliced (Red). Orlik Tobacco Company A/S, DK. “A delightful blend of golden and full body Virginibesta tobaccos with a touch of Burley. A fine natural sweetness in taste and aroma characterizes Orlik Golden Sliced. The cut is the traditional Navy Cut Flake i.e. pressed tobacco and cut into slices. Rub the tobacco slices gently before filling your pipe”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g Pouch, 50g & 100g tins.

Long Golden Flake (No. 71). Reiner, DE. Blender: R.L. Will. “A very special blend of golden Virginias, a little “white” Burley, and a touch of Perique to make things interesting. Pressed into long flakes, sliced, then rolled in the tin in long strips”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Perique. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 100g tin.

University Flake. Peterson, IE. Blender: Kohlhase, Kopp & Co. “Originally manufactured in Ireland by Murray, and now manufactured in Germany by Kohlhase & Kopp. The new tin description reads “An easy smoking blend of fine Virginias and Burley tobaccos, made the traditional way.” Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia. Flavoring: Plum. A light, berry-like top dressing applied that is evident in the smoke. The K&H website describes it as “pflaume” which is the German word for plum. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g Tin.

Original Mixtures: Barbary Coast. G. L. Pease, USA. “The finest cube-cut Burley, chosen for its deep, nutty flavors, forms a robust foundation for this sophisticated blend. Rich, red Virginia tobaccos are added for their subtle sweetness and complexity, while the unique spice of Perique provides added dimension. A delicate kiss of Brandy polishes the blend to a perfect finish. Barbary Coast is delightfully satisfying, with hints of black walnut, dark chocolate, and dried fruits. The perfect “all-day” smoke”! Curing Group: Sun Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Perique. Flavoring: Brandy. Cut: Cube cut. Packaging: 2oz & 8oz tin. Introduced in March, 2001. Note: The addition of a brandy casing and a component of Perique make this an unusual blend – a type of aromatic burley.

Stonehaven. Esoterica Tobacciana, J.F. Germain & Son, UK. “A marriage of air-cured leaf and Burley with selected dark Virginia. Hard pressed and aged to produce brown flakes with dark undertones. A traditional English flake favored by experienced pipe smokers”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 8oz bag. Note: A highly atypical blend -definitely not a touchstone blend for the category. Included here to illustrate the absolute limits of the style. An oddball and an “envelope pusher” – but worth trying when available.

9. Burley Blends –

Carter Hall. John Middleton, Inc., USA. “Burley blended smoking mixture”. Curing Group:Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 1.5oz Pouch.

Prince Albert. John Middleton Inc., USA. “Crimp-cut, mild smoking mixture. Made in the USA”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia (minor). Cut: Ribbon.

Half & Half. Pinkerton Tobacco, USA. “Burley based pipe tobacco. Made in the USA”. Heavy casing of Anise. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia. Flavoring: Anise. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Pouch, 100g Tin. Note: Originally from an American Tobacco 19th century formula. Originally, it was a local Virginia favorite for both cigarettes and pipe tobacco.

Burley London Blend. Mac Baren, DK. “Introduced in 1965 and consists mainly of carefully selected Burley tobaccos. Just a little Virginia has been added to give the blend a natural sweetness. You will notice the slight natural chocolate note, which is found in all good Burley tobacco. The very special top flavor in combination with the tobaccos gives you a very distinct smoking pleasure”. Curing Group: Sun Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia (minor). Flavoring: Cocoa /Chocolate. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 100g Tin.

Navy Flake. Mac Baren, DK. “A mild flake blended from the finest Burley tobaccos with added ripe Virginias and Cavendish. Navy Flake is light burning, making the lighting of the pipe very easy”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Cavendish, Virginia, Flavoring: Rum. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g Pouch, 100g tin. Introduced in 1965.

Wilke Nut Brown Burley. Pipeworks & Wilke, USA. Blender: Carole Burns. “A distinctive blend of aged cube cut Burley. An old fashioned slow burning tobacco with a naturally pleasant aroma, and no added sweeteners”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Turkish. Cut: Cube. Packaging: Bulk.

10. Virginia / Perique Blends –
Escudo Navy Deluxe. Peter Stokkebye, DK. “A combination of full bodied Virginia from North Carolina and Virginia blended with Perique from Louisiana are the cornerstones in Escudo. The blend is pressed and matured before it is spun and cut into coins. This process ensures the unique character of Escudo. Produced by the Cope brothers from 1870 to 1936, at which point they were bought by Gallaher. Gallaher produced Escudo until 1994. A&C Petersen began production in 1997, with the original presses. Now blended by Peter Stokkebye, imported and distributed by Villager Stokkebye International”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Perique. Cut: Curly Cut / Coins. Packaging: 50g tin.

St. James Flake. Samuel Gawith, UK. “A sumptuous blend of Virginias and Perique, this big, bold British style flake incorporates a generous proportion of St. James Parish, LA perique”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia, Perique. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g Tin.

Luxury Bullseye Flake. Peter Stokkebye, DK. “A blend of ripe Virginia tobacco spiced with pure Louisiana Perique. The distinctive aroma of Perique combined with the natural sweetness of Virginia tobaccos provides a wonderful characteristic taste. The center of mellow, fermented Black Cavendish serves to smoother the general impression and rounding the taste. It is all a handcrafted process from selecting the best tobacco, blending, rolling, cutting, and packing. The result is an unparalleled smoking experience”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Black Cavendish, Virginia, Perique. Cut: Curly Cut. Packaging: Bulk.

633 Virginia Flake with Perique. Solani, DE. Blender: R.L. Will. “A matured virginia, pressed flake, with premium perique”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Perique. Cut: Flake. Packaging: 50g tin.

Bayou Morning Flake. Cornell & Diehl, USA. Blender: Bob Runowski. “Bayou Morning Flake is a much different tobacco from original bayou Morning. This is a very dark brown crumbly flake. To my taste it is very mellow and smooth with just the right amount of Perique”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia, Perique. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging:50g tin.

Fog City Selection: Fillmore. G. L. Pease, USA. “A thick-sliced, broken flake in the Scottish tradition. Ripe red Virginia tobaccos are combined with a generous measure of fine Louisiana Perique, and then pressed to marry the components and deepen the flavors. The cakes are sliced and gently broken before tinning. Fillmore presents an elegant sweetness and delightful piquancy, enhanced by a creamy richness that develops throughout the bowl. Sit back, and enjoy a lovely,leisurely smoke”! Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Perique. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: 2oz tin. Released in June, 2006.

Bulk No.2015 Virginia Flake. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “This tobacco is made from rich, orange and Red Virginias to which enough St. James Perique has been added to create a refreshing smoke”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia, Perique. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: Bulk.

Luxury Navy Flake. Peter Stokkebye, DK. “Very mature Old Belt flue-cured Virginia’s spiced with Louisiana Perique”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia, Perique. Cut: Flake. Packaging: Bulk.
Personal Reserve: St. James Woods. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “A highly sophisticated broken Flake of matured Red and Black stoved Virginias pressed with the finest Louisiana Perique. This beautiful, mottled tobacco has an especially deep, rich character with that mysterious and compelling aroma that is Perique’s alone. A truly satisfying delight for natural Virginia pipe tobacco”. Curing Group: Fire Cured. Contents: Virginia, Perique. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: 50g & 100g tin.

11. Virginia / Perique / Burley Blends –
Original Mixtures: Haddo’s Delight. G. L. Pease, USA. “Haddo’s Delight is a stout blend of several Virginia tobaccos with a generous measure of long-cut Perique. Unflavored Green River black Cavendish and a little air-cured white Burley ribbon provide fullness, body, and a bit of extra strength. Finally, an exclusive process darkens and marries the mixture, and gives the blend a subtle tin aroma of cocoa and dried fruit. The flavor is full on the palate, earthy, slightly sweet and intriguingly piquant, with overtones of figs and raisins. A wonderful blend for the Perique lover”! Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Black Cavendish, Virginia, Perique. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 2oz, 8oz & 16 oz tins. Introduced in August, 2000.

126: Old Joe Krantz. Cornell & Diehl, USA. Blender: Bob Runowski. “Ribbon and coarse cut burleys, perique and red virginia. Shades of brown with the characteristic mustiness of perique”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Perique, Cut: Coarse Cut. Packaging: Bulk.

Exhausted Rooster. Cornell & Diehl, USA. Blender: Toney / Tarler. “C&D’s annual blend for the 2008 Chicago Show. A tasty flake of Virginias, Dark Fired Burley and a dash of Perique”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Perique. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: 2 & 8 oz tins.

107: Haunted Bookshop. Cornell & Diehl, USA. Blender: Bob Runowski. “A predominantly Burley mixture with a touch of red Virginia and Perique”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Perique. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: Bulk. Note: some may place this blend in the Virginia / Burley Blend category on account of the heavy influence of the burley, but the inclusion of Perique brings it here.

12. Virginia / Oriental Blends –
Original Mixtures: Cairo. G. L. Pease, USA. “Cairo is a wonderfully complex mixture of red, orange and bright Virginia tobaccos, exotic oriental leaf, and just a whisper of Perique. The flavor is naturally sweet, slightly nutty, delicately spicy and rich. Subtle citrus-like notes harmoniously support the more robust flavors of the darker Virginias. A medium-bodied tobacco with a delicate aroma, Cairo will satisfy Virginia lovers and the connoisseur of oriental mixtures alike”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Perique, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 2 & 8 oz tins. Introduced March, 2000. Note: Due to the presence of Perique, some may wish to acknowledge this as a Virginia / Perique Blend, however to my palate the Perique is a very insignificant component to this blend.

Fog City Selection: Embarcadero. G. L. Pease, USA. “Rich, ripe red virginias are combined with top-grade Izmir leaf, pressed and aged in cakes, then sliced into flakes and tinned. The result is a wonderfully fragrant, natural blend with subdued sweetness, more “brut” than “demi-sec”, delightful toasty flavors, and hints of nuttiness and roasted coffee. Satisfying and refreshing; a comforting smoke, with enough complexity to keep it interesting”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Turkish (Izmir Leaf). Cut: Coarse Cut. Packaging: 2 & 8 oz tins. Introduced July, 2007.

Dunhill Early Morning Pipe. Orlik Tobacco Company A/S, DK. “Sweet Oriental carefully blended with Bright and Red Virginias, pressed and lightly stoved. Great as the `first pipe` arousing the palate for the further pleasures of the day”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g. Tin, 100g Tin. Previously released by Murray’s and Sons, UK.

Bulk No. 2045 Oriental Mixture. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “This is a soft and sweet, rich in light Orientals and Carolina tobaccos with less Latakia than No.2040. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia (slight), Orientals. Cut: Broken Flake. Packaging: Bulk.

Oriental No. 14. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. ”Dark with Latakia and Black Virginias, deeply seasoned with Orientals, this is the classic full Scottish smoke”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin, 100g Tin.

Grand Orientals: Drama Reserve. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “The famed Drama leaf is sweet and subtle with a natural olive oil fragrance. It is grown on the Southern slopes and foothills of the Rhodope Mountains, the Classic Drama Basma District in Greek Eastern Macedonia, and includes the renowned Mahalia. It is refreshing, delicate, intriguing. This blend is designed to demonstrate just why the classic top-grade Drama leaf is so celebrated”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g & 100g tin.

Campanile. James Fox, DE. Blender: Planta. “A blend of Virginian and flavoured with pure Turkish leaf. It embodies absolutely no black tobaccos and is a blend which is delightfully smooth and sweet down to the last shred”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Turkish. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin.
Oriental. Robert McConnell, DE. Blender: Kohlhase, Kopp und Co. KG.”A century old formula, traditional mixture of Oriental and Virginia tobaccos. The formula contains a big fatty amount of Macedonia, Virginia Bright, Red Virginia and Cavendish added for even more sweetness”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Cavendish, Virginia, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin.

Oriental No. 40. Peretti, USA. “A blend entirely made of tobaccos from the Near East. It has richness and full flavor”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Oriental, Turkish. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: Bulk.

13. Light / Medium Latakia Mixtures –
Original Mixtures: Caravan. G. L. Pease, USA. “Rich, smoky Cyprian Latakia and a variety of wonderful Oriental tobaccos set the stage for the blend. Lemon and Red Virginias provide support, while adding a hint of sweetness. Finally, just a touch of air cured leaf is added for body. Caravan is full and exotic; rich and spicy. A classic Balkan style blend with our own special touch”. Curing Group: Fire Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Latakia, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 2 & 8oz tins. Note: Because of the presence of Latakia, GL Pease’s Caravan is placed here in the “Light / Medium Latakia” category, however, to my palate, the Latakia presence is subservient to the Virginias and Orientals which predominate, which could lead some to place this as an “Virginia / Oriental Blend”.

Fog City Selection: Ashbury. G. L. Pease, USA. “An alluring assortment of exotic oriental tobaccos is generously blended with bright and red Virginia leaf. Finally, just enough Cyprus Latakia is added to provide an alluring smokiness, resulting in a tobacco that can best be described as a light-medium Balkan mixture. This is the blend for gentlemen with a Bohemian spirit and a sense of adventure”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Oriental. Cut: Coarse Cut. Packaging: 2oz Tin. Released in October, 2005.

Old London Series: Chelsea Morning. G. L. Pease, USA. “Sweet red and bright Virginias, fragrant orientals, a bit of rich Cyprus Latakia, and just a pinch of Perique. The leaf is blended in layers, briefly pressed, then sliced and tumbled into ribbons. Lively and engaging, with a subtle fruitiness, and an elegant, creamy texture, it’s a great bowl to accompany the morning cup”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Perique, Oriental. Cut: Ready Rubbed. Packaging: 2oz & 8oz tins. Introduced in October, 2009.

Classic Collection: Blackpoint. G. L. Pease, USA. “Blackpoint is a luxurious blend of red and lemon Virginias, Cyprian Latakia, exotic oriental tobaccos, and a perfect measure of Louisiana perique for a lively, piquant finish. The smoke is creamy and lingering, engaging the palate with a mouth-filling array of wonderful flavours. Reminiscent of raisins and stewed figs, fireplaces in the fall, walks in the forest… Perhaps the most complex in the collection. Perfect for evenings”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Perique, Orienta. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 2oz & 8oz tins. Released in March, 2003.

Classic Collection: Kensington. G. L. Pease, USA. “Kensington is a Balkan style blend with restraint. Bright and red Virginias are combined with richly flavoured leaf from the orient and Cyprian Latakia in perfect measure for a wonderfully balanced smoke. Slightly sweeter than Charing Cross, and not quite as full due to a more delicate hand with the Latakia. Spicy, with an occasional suggestion of orange blossom. Complex, but never ponderous. A slightly lighter variant of the classic style”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 2oz &, 8oz tins. Released in March, 2003.

Dunhill London Mixture. Orlik Tobacco Company A/S, DK. “Skillfully blended Latakia with Virgina and Turkish. Pleasant aroma and a flavor never tiring”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Turkish. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin. Previously released by Murray’s and Sons, UK.
Dunhill Standard Mixture Medium. Orlik Tobacco Company A/S, DK. “Latakia, Orientals, East Carolina and Georgian, all lightly toasted. A slightly heavier companion to DUNHILL’s Standard Mixture Mild. Traditional English”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin. Previously released by Murray’s and Sons, UK.

And So To Bed. Esoterica Tobacciana, J.F. Germain & Son, UK. “Finest grade Virginia and Maryland type tobaccos are carefully aged and blended with Greek Oriental” leaf and top-grade Cyprian Latakia. The blend is then specially processed and additionally matured to produce a mellow full strength smoke with rich flavor and unique aroma”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Latakia, Oriental, Maryland. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin.

Margate. Esoterica Tobacciana, J.F. Germain & Son, UK. “A classical English mixture done in the “old style” of many of the fine tobaccos that have now disappeared from the market place. Choice Orientals and generous quantities of premium Cyprian Latakia keynote this rich, full bodied blend. A well balanced, robust and eminently satisfying smoke”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Latakia, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin, 8oz. Note: This blend could just as easily be placed in the “Medium / Full Latakia Mixture”, however, to my palate, the Orientals ride over the Latakia here.
Squadron Leader. Samuel Gawith, UK. “Bright and Dark Virginias blended together with Latakia and Turkish leaf to make this a cool medium bodied smoke”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Turkish. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin. Note: I have placed this blend here, rather than under Virginia / Oriental Blends, because of the presence of the Latakia component.
Bald Headed Teacher. 4noggins, USA. Blender: Rich Gottlieb. “The old-fashioned burley taste comes through in full form, nutty and brisk, hitting on tangy notes along the way as the Virginia components catch on. There’s just enough Latakia to provide no more than perhaps a seasoning effect”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Latakia. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: Bulk. Note: Some may place this blend in the Virginia / Burley Blend category, however, the presence of Latakia suggests a Light / Medium Latakia Mixture placement.

101: Morley’s Best. Cornell & Diehl, USA. Blender: Bob Runowski. “This is a combination of three Burleys (rough cut, white & cubed), Virginia flake and Cyprian Latakia”. Blend Notes: Reminiscent of old original Blue Boar blend. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Burley, Virginia, Latakia. Cut: Coarse cube cut. Packaging: Bulk. Note: Some may place this blend in the Virginia /Burley Blend category, however, the presence of Latakia suggests a Light /Medium Latakia Mixture placement.
Frog Morton. McClelland Tobacco Company. “An exceptionally dark, rich and full Latakia Mixture designed for those who desire really satisfying Latakia flavor but want a pipe tobacco soft enough to smoke anytime. It took Frog Morton four years designed for smoking in quiet serenity. It is his proudest achievement”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin, 100g Tin.

Frog Morton across the Pond. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “Remarkably cool-smoking, delightfully fragrant. Frog Morton journeyed far across the pond to find the exotic components for this rich, smooth pipe tobacco blend enhanced with rare Syrian Latakia. He says it was worth the trip”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin, 100g Tin.

Frog Morton on the Town. McClelland Tobacco Company, USA. “Frog Morton formulated this exceptionally mellow blend, fragrant with Basma, smooth and rich with Latakia, for his evening at the opera. This is an elegant companion to the original, soft, full Latakia blend. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Latakia, Oriental, Turkish. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 50g Tin, 100g Tin.

Esoterica: Penzance. “A wonderful complex secret recipe of the finest Virginias, choice Turkish and Orientals and Cyprian Latakia, all hand blended together, hard pressed and broad cut into thick flakes. Long matured and easily crumbled to facilitate pipe filling. This is one of the finest traditional English Flakes available anywhere”.

14. Medium / Full Latakia Mixtures –
066. Star of the East. Cornell & Diell, USA. “One half Latakia with a generous portion of Turkish and sweetened with stoved red Virginia”. Curing Group: Air Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Turkish. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: Bulk.

Captain Earles: Ten Russians. “Ten Russians is a true delight for lovers of Latakia. Rich and full bodied, it is pressed to deliver a perfectly balanced blend to the true aficionado of full English tobaccos”.

Heirloom Collection: Westminster. G.L. Pease, USA. “The very essence of the traditional English mixture; rich, elegant, refined, and exquisitely balanced. New World red Virginias are enhanced with a gentle caress of bright leaf, then lavishly seasoned with rich oriental tobaccos and generous measures of noble Cyprus mountain Latakia. Westminster is a satisfying blend, presenting layers of flavor to delight the senses and develop in the bowl. A perfect everyday English mixture. Full-bodied”. Curing Group: Fire Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Orientas. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 2oz & 8oz tins. Introduced in January, 2007. Note: A detailed review of the blend has been posted at Luxury Tobacco Reviews.

Original Mixtures: Odyssey. G.L. Pease, USA. “Odyssey is huge – the biggest of the Pease blends. It’s loaded with Latakia and harmonized by exotic Orientals. Wonderful red and jet-black stoved Virginias provide a perfect counterpoint”. Curing Group: Fire Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Oriental. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 2oz & 8oz tins. Released in January, 2002.

Classic Collection: Abingdon. GL Pease, USA. “Abingdon is the fullest Balkan style blend in the range. It is rich and robust, powerful and forthright, yet still possessing subtlety and finesse. Dark flavors of wood and leather mingle with delicate undercurrents of sweetness, and deep earthy notes, while the oriental tobaccos provide hints of their verdant, sometimes herbaceous character. A big Balkan blend, reminding us once more of what these blends used to be. Because of the high percentage of dark and oriental tobaccos, it’s recommended to pack Abingdon a little less firmly than you might a lighter blend”. Curing Group: Fire Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Oriental, Turkish. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 2oz & 8oz tins. Released in July, 2003.

Classic Collection: Charing Cross. G.L. Pease, USA. “Charing Cross is a traditional Balkan style blend of fine Virginia leaf, richly seasoned with smoky Cyprian Latakia, and spiced with the exquisite and exotic tobaccos of the orient. This is the one for Latakia lovers. Hints of roasted cocoa beans, orange zest, green pepper and campfires. This is the big one – fuller than Blackpoint, and a little less sweet”. Curing Group: Flue Cured. Contents: Virginia, Latakia, Orienta. Cut: Ribbon. Packaging: 2oz & 8oz tins. Released in March, 2003.

Commonwealth Mixture. Samuel Gawith, UK. “Tin Description: 50% heavily steamed Virginia & 50% Cyprus Latakia.

Cornell & Diehl: Pirate Kake. “A smooth, robust blend with LOTS of exceptional Latakia accompanied by Turkish and cavendish cut Burley. This is the blend for the Latakia lover. No Virginias. Latakia at 70%”.

15. Cigar Leaf Blends –
GL Pease. Key Largo. “Deep, Earthy and Creamy. A distinguished broken flake of Red Virginia tobaccos, small leaf orientals, and a measure of Cyprus Latakia, spiced with velvety cigar wrapper leaf. Key Largo develops throughout the bowl, offering a satisfying and sturdy smoking experience, with beautifully balanced, richly textured layers of cocoa, dark roasted coffee, leather, and a lively, lingering finish”.

Cornell & Diehl: Habana Daydreams. “A flavorful blend of Virginias with Perique and unsweetened Black Cavendish. The mixture also features a dash of Latakia and a spoonful of cigar leaf”.

Cornell & Diehl: Billy Budd. “A heavy Latakia blend with rough-cut burley, bright Virginia flake and a good amount of rough-cut cigar leaf”.

16. Aromatics –
Lane’s 1Q Pipe Tobacco. “Lane’s 1Q Pipe Tobacco is amazingly popular. Void of any factory packaging and very unremarkably named, it’s surprising that Lane 1Q pipe tobacco easily ranks among the best-selling pipe tobacco in the world. But just a few puffs in, you’ll realize why. The tobacco selection consists of a perfectly proportioned blend of Golden Cavendish complimented by a touch of fire-cured Cavendish. Mellow in body, but big on flavor, this smooth, aromatic tobacco delivers a rich, sweet, and smooth experience that’s layered with notes of vanilla, oak, and fruit”.

Mac Baren: 7 Seas Regular. “Black Cavendish and Golden Burleys. A soft and exceptionally mellow smoke combined to create a delightful, aromatic taste”.

Captain Black: Regular (White). “The Captain Black blends are a line of aromatic Cavendish concoctions that enjoy an immensely widespread popularity the world over. This, the original mixture, combines rich black Cavendish with mellow Burleys”.

Cornell & Diehl: Autumn Evening. “A Red Virginia cavendish cased with a delicate maple flavor. An exceptionally smooth aromatic”.

Boswell’s Aromatic Blends. Berry Cobbler. “Hints of spice in the aroma that reminds me of a berry cobbler just out of the oven. Intense fruit aromas with a taste that is smooth the whole time. A light smoke and definitely a crowd pleaser”.

Boswell’s Aromatic Blends. Christmas Cookie. “Very mild blend which Dan has created by hand to maintain each tobacco’s individual characteristics. Christmas Cookie, tempts the most discriminating palate. Creates a delightful aroma. The name says it all. Created Nov. 2002. Here is an ideal tobacco for a Christmas gift, a tobacco that every pipe smoker will enjoy as a real Holiday Treat”!

Dunhill Pipe Shapes – collated by Eric W. Boehm


Blog by Eric Boehm

This collated information was collected by Eric Boehm and Permission was granted to include it here on the blog. Many thanks to Eric for the information he has collected for us.

Briar & Leaf Followers,

For years, I have been interested in collecting and smoking Dunhill pipes. During this time, I have been an avid follower of the late John C. Loring, his collections, and his writings on the subject of Dunhill pipes. I have also tried to collect all of the published Dunhill catalogs. Despite the occasional listings of Dunhill pipe shapes in various catalogs, books and on the web, I had yet to come across a single complete list of published Dunhill pipe shapes. Thus, the impetus for the current listings.

The tables below follow a set pattern for each shape entry. First, the shape category is listed in bold, then, for each entry, I have provided the shape number, a short descriptor, group number estimate, size (inches), catalog presence, and the modern shape number equivalent.

Image

Shape Descriptor Group Size Catalog(s) Modern #

Billiards

31 Billiard, tapered bit 1 4¾” 1928, 1950 3
32 Billiard, tapered bit 1 5″ 1928, 50, 60, 69 3
34 Billiard, tapered bit (Dental) 2 5½” 1928, 50, 60, 69 3
35 Billiard, tapered bit (Dental) 3 5½” 1928, 50, 60, 69 3
35 Airstream billiard, tapered 3 5″ 1950, 1969 3
39 Billiard, saddle bit 3 5½” 1950, 1969 3
41 Billiard, tapered bit 1928 3
44 Billiard, oval shank, tapered 3 5¾ 1928, 50, 60, 69 3
57 Army mount billiard 3 6½” 1928, 50, 69 3
59 Billiard, tapered bit 4 5¾” 1928, 50, 69 3
60 Billiard, tapered bit 4 5½” 1928, 50, 60, 69 3
59 Bamboo billiard 4 5¾” 1950, 1969 3
60 Bamboo billiard 4 5½” 1950, 1969 3
59 Airstream billiard, tapered bit 4 5¾” 1950, 1969 3
60 Airstream billiard (Dental) 4 5½” 1950 3
64 Billiard, tapered bit 1 5½” 1950, 1969 3
66 Billiard, tapered, stand-up 1928
70 Army mount billiard 2 1928, 50, 69 3
72 Billiard, canted, oval, tapered 1928
92 Army mount billiard 4 1950, 1969 3
94 Army mount billiard (Dublin?) 1928
104 Billiard, canted, oval, tapered 4 5½” 1928,1950, 1969 3
105 Billiard, tapered bit 1 5¼” 1950, 1969 3
111 Billiard, tapered bit 3 5¼” 1950, 1960, 1969 3
113 Billiard, long tapered bit 2 5½” 1928, 50, 60, 69 3
114 Billiard, extended tapered bit 1 5¼” 1928, 50, 69 3
116 Billiard, extended tapered bit 1928
126 Billiard, tapered bit 1928
131 Billiard, diamond shank, tapered 1928
164 Billiard, tapered, stand-up 1928
171 Billiard, tapered, stand-up 1928
196 Billiard, tapered bit 4 5½” 1928, 1950, 1969 3
197 Billiard, extended tapered bit 4 6½” 1950, 1969 3
248 Billiard, tapered bit 1 5¼” 1950, 1960, 1969 3
249 Billiard, tapered bit 1 5¾” 1950, 1969 3
250 Billiard, long tapered bit 2 5¾” 1960, 1969 3
250 The Windscreen Pipe 2 5¾” 1960 3
251 Billiard, tapered bit (Relief bit) 3 5¾” 1950 3
251 Airstream billiard, tapered bit 4 5¾” 1950 3
251 The Windscreen Pipe 5 5¾” 1950, 1969
252 Billiard, tapered bit 4 5¾” 1950, 1969 3
253 Billiard, tapered bit 4 57/8″ 1950, 1969 3
260 Billiard, tapered bit 2 5½” 1950, 1969 3
305 Riding or Sport 2 3¼ 1928, 1950, 1969 3
332 Billiard, canted, oval 1928
335 Billiard, canted, oval 1928
576 Billiard, saddle bit 1 5″ 1950, 1960, 1969 3
577 Billiard, saddle bit 2 4¾” 1950, 60 (5″), 69 3
632 Billiard, saddle bit 1 5¼” 1950, 1969 3
634 Billiard, saddle bit 2 5¼” 1950, 1969 3
635 Billiard, saddle bit 3 5¾” 1950, 1969 3
635 The Windscreen Pipe 3 1969 3
659 Billiard, saddle bit 4 5½” 1950, 1969 3
660 Billiard, saddle bit 4 5½” 1950, 1969 3
710 Billiard, tapered bit 4 5½” 1950, 1969 3
715 Scandinavian billiard 2 5″ 1950, 1969 3
LB Billiard, large, tapered bit 4 5¾” 1928, 1950, 1969 3
LBS Billiard, large, tapered bit 4 6½” 1950, 1969 3

Bent Billiards

50 Bent billiard army shank 1928 2
51 Bent billiard army shank 1928 2
52 Bent billiard, short cut bowl 1928 2
53 Bent billiard 3 5¼” 1928, 50, 60, 69 2
53 Bent Windscreen Pipe 3 1969
54 Bent billiard 2 4¾” 1928, 1950, 1969 2
56 Bent billiard 4 5½” 1928, 50, 60, 69 2
120 Bent billiard, large 4 6″ 1950, 1969 2
121 Bent billiard, oval shank 2
132 Bent billiard, straight sided bowl, 1928 2
306 Bent billiard, large round brandy 1928 2
321 Bent billiard, large flat bowl, 2
329 Bent billiard, large round apple bowl 1928 2
LC Bent billiard, very large, quaint shape 1928 2

Apples

67 Apple triangular shank stand-up, angled tapered bit 1928 1
85 Apple, round shank, reg. tapered bit 1928 1
97 Army mounts (silver) straight apple 1928 1
98 Army mounts (silver) straight apple 1928 1
107 Apple, tapered bit 3 5¼ 1928, 1950, 1969 1
110 Apple, long tapered bit 1 5½” 1928, 1950, 1960 1
112 Apple, tapered bit 2 5¾” 1928, 1950, 1960 1
115 Apple, canted, extended tapered 1928 1
191 Apple, beveled, short shank, extended tapered bit 1928 1
256 Apple, long saddle bit 2 5¼” 1950, 1960 1
308 Apple Army Mount (Silver) push bit 1928 1
309 Apple Army Mount (Silver) push bit 1928 1
310 Apple Army Mount (Silver) push bit 1928 1
311 Apple Army Mount (Silver) push bit 1928 1
376 Apple, bowl canted forward, extended tapered bit 1928 1
K Apple, tapered bit 4 5¼” 1950, 1960 1

Pots

463 Pot, long tapered bit 2 5¾” 1950, 1960, 1969 6
501 Pot, tapered bit 3 5¾” 1950, 1969 6
R Pot, tapered bit, “Quaint” 4 5¼” 1928, 50, 60, 69 6

Princes

258 Prince, apple-like, long straight
tapered bit 1 5¾” 1950, 1960, 1969 7
314 Prince, slightly bent tapered 2 6¼” 1950, 1969 7
315 Prince, straight tapered bit 2 6¼” 1950, 1969 7
FE Prince, large, squat apple-like bowl (Quaint in 1928) 4 6½” 1928, 1950, 1969 7
FET Prince (upright) large squat applelike bowl (Quaint in 1928) 4 6¼” 1928, 50, 60, 69 7

Canadians

335 Canadian, oval shank, short tapered bit 3 5¾” 1928, 1950, 1969 9
EC Canadian, oval shank, short tapered bit (Quaint in 1928) 4 5½” 1928, 1950, 1969 9
850 Canadian, over-sized OD850, Giant, short tapered bit 8¾ 1950, 1969 9

Liverpools

33 Liverpool, tapered 2 5¼” 1928, 50, 60, 69 10
36 Liverpool, large, tapered 4 5½” 1928, 50, 60, 69 10
331 Liverpool, long shank, tapered 3 6″ 1950, 1969 10

Lovats

37 Lovat, short, thick, saddle 1928 11
38 Lovat, long shank, saddle bit 3 4¾” 1928, 50, 60, 69 11
40 Lovat, long shank, saddle bit 4 5″ 1928, 1950, 1969 11
481 Lovat, long shank, saddle bit 1 5″ 1950, 1969 11

Dublins

42 Dublin, tapered bit 3 5½” 1928, 50, 60, 69 5
43 Dublin, tapered bit 2 4¾” 1928, 50, 69 5
65 Dublin, tapered bit 1928
73 Dublin, tapered bit 1928
77 Dublin, tapered bit 1928
130 Dublin, long tapered bit 1 6¼” 1928, 1950, 1969 5
137 Dublin, long tapered bit 4 6¼” 1950, 1969 5
140 Dublin, peg, round shank 1928
142 Dublin, tapered bit 4 5¾ 1928, 1950, 1969 5
143 Dublin, long tapered bit 1928
178 Dublin full bent 1928

Bulldogs & Rhodesians

45 Bulldog, ringed, diamond shank, straight saddle 1928 4
46 Bulldog, +/- ringed, diamond shank, straight tapered 2 5″ 1950, 1960, 1969 4
47 Bulldog, +/- ringed, diamond shank, straight tapered 3 5″ 1928, 1950, 1969 4
48 Bulldog, +/- ringed, diamond shank, straight saddle 4 5¼” 1928, 50, 60, 69 4
OX Bulldog, ringed, diamond shank, straight saddle 4 5¼” 1928, 50, 69 4
69 Bulldog, ringed, diamond shank, short saddle bit 1928 4
88 Bulldog, non-ringed, diamond shank, tapered bit 1928 4
146 Bulldog, ringed, diamond shank, slight bent tapered bit 1928 4
148 Bulldog, ringed, diamond shank, straight saddle 3 5¼” 1950, 1969 4
156 Bulldog, ringed, diamond shank, tapered bit 1928 4
189 Bulldog, non-ringed, large, tall bowl, diamond shank, tapered bit 1928 4
190 Bulldog, non-ringed, large, short bevelled bowl, diamond shank, tapered 1928 4
721 Scandinavian Bulldog, elevated bowl, 3-ringed, extended bent, saddle bit 5¼” 1950, 1969

?O Straight Rhodesian, ringed, diamond shank, tapered bit 4 5″ 1928, 50, 60, 69 17
P Bent Rhodesian, ringed, diamond shank, tapered bent bit 4 5¾” 1928, 50, 69 8
PO Rhodesian, slightly bent, tapered, non-ringed 3 51/2 ? ?
6P Bent Rhodesian, ringed, diamond shank, bent saddle bit 5½” 1960 8
145 Straight Rhodesian, ringed, short diamond shank, tapered bit 1928 17
334 Bent Rhodesian, ringed, diamond shank, bent saddle bit 1928 8
344 Rhodesian, ringed, squat bowl, diamond shank, extended bent tapered bit (Prince) 1928 7?
580 Straight Rhodesian, non-ringed, squat bowl, saddle bit 4 1969 17

Pokers

90 Poker “Stand-up” 2 4¾” 1928, 1950, 1969 22
95 Poker “Stand-up” Army bit 1928
475 Friendly 4 5½” 1960
6475 Friendly (=475?) 4 5½” 1950, 1969
483 Poker with cane stem 6½ 1960

Zulus

49 Zulu, straight round stem, tapered bit 1928 21
83 Zulu, oval shank, slightly bent tapered bit 3 5½” 1928, 1950, 1969 21

Miscellaneous

320 Evening Dress (Pot) 4 4½” 1950, 1960, 1969
misc. Dri-way billiard (screw bowl) 4 5¼” 1950, 1960
misc. Cavalier shape 4 6¼” 1950, 1960
misc. Calabash 7″ 1950
misc. Churchwarden 4 10¼” 1950, 1960
misc. “The Bamboo Bent”, bent saddle bit 7½” 1960
misc. “The Bijou”, small bowl, long tapered bit 5″ 1960
misc. Leather covered 4 1950, 1969

Letter Shapes

SS “Quaint Shape” Billiard hexagonal shank & tapered bit 1928
EC “Quaint Shape” Canadian, oval shank, short tapered bit 1928
FR “Quaint Shape” Octagonal panel billiard, round shank, extended tapered bit 1928
OE “Quaint Shape” Octagonal panel billiard, square shank, angled tapered bit 1928
EK “Quaint Shape” Hexagonal panel billiard, square shank, angled tapered bit “Stand-up” 1928
VT “Quaint Shape” tirangular panel billiard, tirangular shank and bit “Stand-up” 1928
SA “Quaint Shape” octogonal tall panel billiard, hexagonal shank, angled bit “Stand-up” 1928
GD “Quaint Shape” Circular tall billiard, ringed low at bowl base, round shank and bit 1928
PK “Quaint Shape” Four sided panel billiard, diamond shank and bit 1928
PL “Quaint Shape” Four sided panel billiard,triangular shank and bit 1928
EL “Quaint Shape” Four sided panel billiard, triangular shank and bit 1928
FJ “Quaint Shape” Cutty, canted round bowl, extended tapered bit 1928
KS “Quaint Shape” Apple, flattened bowl support peg “Stand-up” 1928
K “Quaint Shape” Round Apple, converging rim, round shank, tapered bit 1928
FE “Quaint Shape” Apple, large squat bowl, round shank, extended tapered bit 1928
FET “Quaint Shape” Apple, large squat bowl, round shank, extended tapered bit 1928
E “Quaint Shape” Army mount (silver) large squat bowl, round shank, extended tapered bit 1928
ET “Quaint Shape” Army mount (silver) large squat bowl, round shank, extended tapered bit 1928
EK Paneled billiard 1950, 1969

343 Inverted low-slung bowl, narrow rim, round shank and tapered bit 1928

ODA Shapes (From: John C. Loring, http://loringpage.com/pipearticles/ODchart.htm)

801 Belge, Cocked bowl (5) large for shape – early dating, rare
802 Bent Antique, spur (4) ‘70s/’80s with non ODA #s – early dating, rare
803 Odd Bent (4) – early dating, rare
804 Odd Bent (4) – early dating, rare
805 Skater (4) CH shape – early dating, rare
806 Apple, Tapered Bit
818 Oom Paul (5) – early dating, rare
821 Danish Bent (4) ‘70s/’80s with non ODA #s – early dating, rare
824 Brandy Glass – early dating, rare
827 Rhodesian, Small – early dating, rare
830 Liverpool – early dating extremely rare
831 Bent, Cocked bowl (4) ‘70s/’80s with non ODA #s – early dating, rare
832 Lovat – early dating quite rare
833 Danish Style Bent – early dating, rare
834 Prince – early dating quite rare
835 Billiard, Tapered Bit
836 Square Panel
837 Bulldog
838 Straight Rhodesian – early dating, rare
839 Qtr Bent Rhodesian – early dating, rare
840 Bent Billiard – (= 846?) early dating, rare
841 Lovat – early dating, rare
842 Apple, Saddle Bit –early dating, rare- (later stamped 6806)
843 Billiard, Saddle Bit -early dating, rare – (later stamped 6835)
844 Poker – early dating , rare
845 Canadian, Large Bowl
846 Bent Apple, Saddle – (= 840?) early dating rare
847 Rhodesian, Quarter Bent, Round Shank – early dating, rare
848 Dublin
849 Stacked Billiard – less thin & shorter than 856 – early dating, rare
850 Canadian, Small Bowl
851 Canadian, Small Bowl, Extra Long – early dating, rare
853 Pot – early dating rare
854 Rhodesian, Full Bent – early dating, rare
855 Canadian, Large Bowl, Extra Long – early dating, rare
856 Stack Billiard – is thinner & taller then the 856 – early dating, rare
857 Bent Brandy – early dating quite rare
861 Angled Squat Panel Bowl, Tapered Square Shank – early dating, rare
862 Dublin Panel – early dating, rare
863 Squat Panel, Front Bottom Curve (4) – early dating extremely rare
865 Angled Convex Rectangular Panel (5) – ‘70s/’80s in Shell finish, rare
866 Square Bowl (4) – early dating, rare